Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Trump Rollback of Disability Rules Can Make Doctor’s Visits Painstaking

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Patients with disabilities cope with rollback of regulations to make medical treatment more accessible -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Oceans Are Heating Up Faster Than Expected

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

The planet may be more sensitive to warming that previously thought, making climate goals more difficult to meet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Kansas State University rower dies from rare bacterial infection

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A top-tier college athlete’s sudden death on Saturday has shaken the rowing community.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Sea May Be Absorbing Way More Heat Than We Thought

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Scientists have developed a radical new method for measuring global warming-induced rising ocean temperatures: They aren't sampling water, but air.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: New Atlas Used to ID Brain Parts for Plans and Actions

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A detailed picture of cell types in some areas of the mouse cortex is put to the test -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: As Beirut’s Trash Crisis Drags on, Children Recycle to Survive

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

BEIRUT—On a small road adjacent to Beirut’s bustling Hamra Street, three boys rummaged through dumpsters overflowing with unsorted garbage. Another stood back, holding a metal trolley with plastic boxes full of tin cans.“We’re collecting steel cans,” Omar (not his real name), the boy with the trolley, told CityLab. “There’s an empty lot in Zuqaq al-Blat [a Beirut neighborhood] whose owner will give us 1,000 Lebanese pounds [$0.66] per kilogram, so we take everything we’ve collected there after we go through all the bins.”Omar and the other scavengers are among hundreds of disadvantaged Syrians and Lebanese who recycle to put food on the table, an opportunity created by the Lebanese government’s gross mismanagement of its solid waste.Omar and his friends, who appeared to be no older than 14, start their day in Ain al-Mreisseh by Beirut’s famous Corniche promenade, and walk around the neighborhoods in the area looking for rubbish that they can trade for cash. Mapping out everywhere the four boys go, snaking through busy streets dragging a wagon filled with cans, it is clear their routine means a long day of hard work.Omar, a Syrian refugee, would not reveal who they sold their cans to. “Are you recycling at home? If you have any cans, we’ll take them from you,” he said.I spoke to another boy a few blocks away later that same evening. It was a near-identical scenario: He was not comfortable sharing his name, he was from Syria, and was collecting tin cans to send to the same place in Zuqaq al-Blat. Unlike Omar, he estimated that he collects 20 to 30 kilograms daily. If that is correct, his maximum yield brings in a little less than $20 a day.The boys said the owner of the lot in Zuqaq al-Blat transports the cans to factories located out of the city in exchange for money. CityLab contacted several factories in the Beirut area that make steel, aluminum, and paper products; none would comment on their relationship with informal scavengers, with nonprofits and NGOs that run recycling programs, or with Beirut’s private waste-collection provider as of this May, Ramco.Lebanon’s garbage crisisLebanon’s waste-management crisis is symptomatic of bigger problems that have plagued the country since the end of a 15-year-long civil war in 1990. With the national government often accused of financial mismanagement and corruption, residents of the country still deal with routine power cuts and insufficient potable water. Those who can afford it pay for external power generators and water delivery services.In this January 2018 photo, an angler in Zouq Mosbeh, north of Beirut, fishes as garbage covers the shore behind him days after a storm. (Hussein Malla/AP)The same applies to recycling and waste management—and a multitude of NGOs and businesses try to fill in the gap left by the state. One social enterprise that has received extensive press coverage is Recycle Beirut. The organization has a small underground warehouse in Bir Hassan, just south of Beirut. Its staff of Lebanese and registered Syrian refugees sort recyclables and send them to factories.“There is no systematic recycling plan [in the country], and non-existent recycling education,” Recycle Beirut’s CEO Kassem Kazak told CityLab. “We are trying to raise awareness about recycling—it’s the only solution in Lebanon.” Recycle Beirut is one of several initiatives that arose after the metropolitan area’s largest landfill was closed and garbage piled up in the streets of Beirut, spurring a wave of protests.Recycle Beirut has been praised by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. But it and other NGOs can’t solve the whole city’s garbage problem, and a network of informal trash-recyclers has emerged. Although they are certainly mitigating the impact of the crisis, these recyclers are not as fortunate as Recycle Beirut’s employees. Most Syrian refugees in Lebanon are undocumented, and many of the trash scavengers are also minors. They are subject to long hours rummaging through the garbage without masks, gloves, or any safety equipment. The trash collectors’ situation is symptomatic of Lebanon’s wider economic problems and the ongoing issue of child labor.Lebanon has ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. But the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCR) has said the prevalence of child beggars is one of Lebanon’s three major problems relating to its children, along with corporal punishment and the enlisting of children in armed groups.Lebanon’s policy toward Syrian refugees has also played a role, especially after the foreign ministry ordered the UNHCR to suspend refugee registrations in May 2015. “There is no doubt that the Syrian refugees in Lebanon are living under very difficult economic conditions, in part by being in a country without status,” said Lama Fakih, the Middle East and North Africa deputy director at Human Rights Watch. “In a number of cases, Syrians have been required to sign commitments to not work. That has increased financial pressure on families, which has resulted in child labor.”Recycling potential squanderedSolid waste in Beirut and almost all Mount Lebanon districts is currently collected and managed by Ramco, a large private corporation that also has engineering and real estate interests. Ramco has boasted about its line of environmentally-friendly technology, notably its Euro 5 emission-standard vehicles.A 2017 report on waste management, published by Lebanon’s ministry of environment, reported that Ramco’s districts produced 2,850 tons of waste a day, roughly 51 percent of all waste in Lebanon.The Council for Development and Reconstruction, an unelected body under the prime minister, plays a pivotal role in waste-management policy in the country. Its latest infrastructural progress report, from October 2017, says that 42 percent of Lebanon’s waste is comprised of recyclable materials (paper, plastic, glass, textiles, and metals). Another 51 percent of the country’s waste is organic (and thus compostable), so a paltry 7 percent of Lebanon’s waste should require storage.Ramco’s waste-management system does not appear to fulfill that potential. When its garbage trucks pass by, the scavengers, especially the children, run off as the workers begin to fill the trucks with trash.Dumpsters in Beirut overflowing with unsorted trash. (Kareem Chehayeb)A new installation with above-ground trash compartments leading to underground bins. (Kareem Chehayeb)Based on observation and videos from around Beirut and Mount Lebanon that have circulated in activist networks, standard practice seems to be to dump all garbage—whether unsorted or placed in special red recycling bins—into the same truck, a compactor truck with one compartment. According to environmental engineer and activist Ziad Abi Chaker, this makes recycling and composting virtually impossible.“The glass bottles are broken and mixed with [the organic material],” Abi Chaker said. “The effort [to separate them] is gone to waste.” Abi Chaker argues that roughly 80 to 90 percent of organic waste can be composted, which would create jobs and stimulate Lebanon’s ailing agricultural sector.Even the ministry of environment concurs with Abi Chaker. Although compactor trucks are more efficient, they reduce the quality and quantity of recycable and compostable material because of “[cross-]contamination” and “commingling” of waste, reads the above-mentioned report. The report estimates that 20 to 30 percent of recyclable cardboard and paper are rejected for contamination. A report by environmental consultants for the environment ministry in 2010 documented that less than 10 percent of recyclables were recovered nationally after waste collection, for the same reason. However, the actual percentage may be higher because of the informal scavengers.Ramco declined several times to comment on its recycling and waste-sorting practices.New system, same resultsRamco and the Beirut municipality recently introduced a new waste-collection system, which they have been installing around the city. Instead of the former clusters of dumpsters, usually with one red bin for recyclable material, the new system puts bins underground, with a small compartment above ground for people to throw in their garbage. Based on observation of the new bins, it can be difficult to insert garbage bags in the compartment, so many people just leave them on the street. And the process appears to remain the same: Whether it’s been separated or not, all waste gets mixed in Ramco’s white compactor trucks.Trucks carry garbage to the new land-reclamation site in Bourj Hammoud in June 2017. (Hussein Malla/AP)That waste ends up in one of two coastal landfills: Costa Brava, near Lebanon’s only airport south of Beirut, or the predominantly Armenian suburb of Bourj Hammoud. Fishermen and residents of both areas have complained about foul odors and waste and leachate making their way into the Mediterranean Sea. The coastal landfills are temporary measures, eventually set to become “reclaimed land” over the water. (Land reclamation is not new in Lebanon; downtown Beirut’s waterfront district was built over a dump filled with waste and rubble from the civil war.)For-profit waste management tied to land reclamation is seen by Abi Chaker and many environmental activists as a huge hindrance to reform. “[Sorting and recycling] is long and hard work, and it’s not profitable,” Abi Chaker said. “[But] land reclamation is profitable …it’s a wicked plan.”

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: New Mexico boy, 9, dies of rodent-borne illness 9 months after diagnosis

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A 9-year-old boy died on Friday nine months after he was diagnosed with Hantavirus, a rare illness typically contracted through exposure to rodent droppings.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: For Some Drivers, Uber Offers New Benefit: Full-Ride Scholarships

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Over the years, Uber has made one thing abundantly clear: The ride-hailing company’s relationship with its drivers is not boss-to-employee. Traditional employers—in the U.S. at least—generally offer healthcare, regular salaries, and benefits to full-time workers. Uber’s only real stated obligation is to program an app.But recently, the company has been working to tighten its bond with the workers that use it. The latest example came today, when Uber announced it will begin providing a new perk to eligible drivers (or their loved ones): free online education through Arizona State University. That’s the biggest benefit of many that will be doled out through the company’s new driver performance rating system, Uber Pro. The company begins beta-testing the system in eight regions this week. “This is a new way for us to recognize drivers on Uber who have really shown their commitment, and the quality service that they’ve delivered,” said Ali Wiezbowski, Uber’s product lead. For the duration of the pilot—which Uber hasn’t yet defined—drivers who maintain a rating of at least 4.85 stars and keep their cancellation rates low can start earning points on each trip they make, in pursuit of ascending Pro statuses: Partner, Gold, Platinum, or Diamond. Drivers in the eight beta regions will be able to use the points they would have accrued over the last three months to start anywhere from Partner to Platinum on day one.The Uber Pro interface, launching in eight cities on Thursday. (Uber)In Seattle, Chicago, New Orleans, Phoenix, Orlando, Tampa, Denver, and all of New Jersey, driver statuses will be assessed every three months, and the perks will unfold like a frequent flyer program. Some address driving expenses, which take a big chunk out of drivers’ earnings. Research from the Economic Policy Center found that compensation for the average Uber driver comes to $11.77 an hour; after paying things like maintenance fees and Uber’s commission, that’s closer to $9.21. Company perks like coupons on car maintenance in certain shops, cash back at gas stations, and free dent repair could help offset those costs. Others will help drivers earn more on each ride: Platinum and Diamond drivers can command rates that are up to six percent higher than their peers. Pro driver earning averages might soon look better.But some rewards are intended to help drivers pursue opportunities out of the car. In conversations with hundreds of drivers, Wiezbowski and her team found that more than a third spoke English as a second language, and that more than half said they planned to start their own business in the next five years. “Many of them told us it can be hard to get started,” she said.Higher education could make it easier. Through Uber Pro, any Platinum- or Diamond-status Uber driver who has completed at least 3,000 lifetime rides qualifies for a full ride to one of three online offerings at ASU: any traditional online undergraduate degree, classes in an English language program, or a certification in entrepreneurship. (Drivers still have to qualify for the degree: If their incoming GPA isn’t high enough, for example, they can go through ASU’s “earned admission” program first, paying $400 per course; then get the free ride after passing four classes with a 2.75 average GPA.)Drivers can also choose to pass on the free tuition to a spouse, domestic partner, child, sibling, parent, legal guardian or dependent. “Drivers told us that supporting their families was one of the main reasons they get on the road every day,” said Daniel Danker, who leads driver product development. “We heard that, and heard that consistently.”Many traditional companies reimburse their employees for continuing ed opportunities, but Uber is the first ride-hailing company to offer an education package this robust. Last year, the firm’s main U.S. rival, Lyft, started offering discounts and some federal financial aid towards certain online education programs, shaving off thousands but not eliminating costs entirely. The closest parallel to Uber’s initiative may be the one offered by Starbucks, which has partnered with ASU since 2014 to offer free online tuition to about 7,200 employees working an average of 20 hours a week through its College Achievement Plan. After a session wraps up later this fall, that program will have graduated more than 2,000 Starbucks students, estimates Phil Regier, dean for educational initiatives at ASU. Through the Starbucks plan, however, only employees who are also veterans or active military can transfer their credit to family members.Once Uber Pro’s pilot period is over, Regier says, Uber’s model could reach Starbucks’ scale or surpass it. He called the program “groundbreaking.”The scholarships program could be a win-win for the scandal-plagued brand and its cash-strapped drivers. Since the ouster of controversial founder Travis Kalanick in 2017 and the arrival of current CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, Uber has been engaged in a safety- and sustainability-focused charm offensive. Free driver tuition fits in with that makeover. “The honest answer is that consumers don’t want to use their service if they don’t feel good about the drivers,” Regier said. “And one way to feel good about the drivers is to know that Uber as a company is treating its drivers well.”The ASU partnership has improved Starbucks’ reputation among customers already, he said. The university has helped with other sorts of corporate damage control: After a Starbucks employee called the police on two black men waiting for a friend in a Philadelphia shop, the pair were given free ASU tuition as part of their settlement.Uber could be making a bet that, to get the full ride, drivers will stay on the road—not only in order to unlock the scholarship, but also to get the most out of the education. Companies invest in tuition benefits to increase the value of each employee‚ according to a 2002 working paper by Peter Cappelli, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. In Uber’s case, drivers might perform better if their English skills improve. Starbucks employees who go to ASU have advanced within the company at three times the rate of other partners, said Regier. Those “quality” employees might also choose to “stay on the job longer, at least in part to keep making use of that benefit,” Cappelli writes.That could help give Uber an edge, because there’s currently a lot of driver turnover. One study found that 68 percent of Uber drivers leave after six months on the job; another revealed that 60 percent of people participate in the transportation gig economy for only three or fewer months per year.Uber drivers have no obligation to stay with Uber once their degree is complete, said Wiezbowski. To remain eligible for their scholarships, though, drivers do have to maintain their Platinum or Diamond status while taking classes. (If “life happens,” she says, they can take a three-month break from the app.)Uber has long insisted that it’s merely a technological middleman connecting self-employed drivers with their passengers, but that relationship appears to be shifting. Drivers in the U.K. went on strike this month over better pay and conditions, arguing that they deserve the same treatment as workers, not independent contractors—and that some of them had been booted unfairly from the app.Since Khosrowshahi took over last year, Uber has begun to acknowledge its outsize role in drivers’ lives, working to improve its reputation among workers and expand supports for them. With more clearly defined incentives and paths to success, the new Uber Pro platform could provide greater transparency to drivers who distrust the algorithmic overlord that rules them. The scholarship program could certainly help sell Uber’s benevolent rebrand. But it could also be a sign that, to make their businesses more humane, even brash gig-economy companies are looking to more traditional employers for direction.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Vulnerabilities of Our Voting Machines

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

When Americans go to the polls, will hackers unleash chaos? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: France investigates reports of babies born without arms in rural areas

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

France has launched a nationwide investigation into why some two dozen babies have been born without hands or arms in a handful of rural areas since 2000 after several new cases were reported this week, the health minister said on Wednesday.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Mom gives birth at grocery store with help of cashier

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

CCTV captured the moment a mom went into labor at a supermarket checkout - and gave birth just 11 minutes later with help from a cashier.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Adenovirus outbreak at New Jersey rehab center claims 10th child, sickens 28, officials say

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A 10th child died Wednesday in a viral outbreak at a New Jersey rehabilitation facility that’s sickened a total of 28 people since September, health officials said.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Singular of “Data” Is Not “Anecdote”

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Why the singular of “data” is not “anecdote” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Making 3-D Models To Recreate Somalia’s Architectural History

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

In 2013, Yusuf Shegow went back to Somalia for the first time in almost ten years. It was the country where he had been born, a place steeped in family history and stories. At the time, Shegow was an architecture student in Manchester, England, and as he and his father walked around Mogadishu, he was struck by the myriad styles and influences amidst the ruins and war-scarred buildings. “It made me question: What used to be here?”Shegow, who grew up in Kenya and the U.K. after leaving Somalia as a child, returned to England after the trip with a reinvigorated fascination for his birthplace. He became obsessed with archives—finding and studying old photographs to better understand how things had once been. The layers of history were like the concentric circles inside a tree: evidence of the country’s many chapters of history, from the Islamic influence to the colonial period.Initially, Shegow focused on archival documentation, but in 2015, inspired by a Master’s project in architecture at Manchester University, he started using the photos he had found of Mogadishu before the war to make 3-D architectural models. Shegow describes the early years of modelling as a “bedroom project,” one he never imagined would interest so many others, particularly among the Somalian diaspora.Three years on, Shegow’s project, Somali Architecture, now includes Madina Scacchi, Iman Mohamed, and Ahmed Mussa—a team based in Italy, the U.K., and the United States—all of whom work with Shegow to better understand history and, they hope, to influence the future. According to Shegow, the project has come to include much more than nostalgia and preservation—it’s also about action and vision for the future.Part of the appeal of the Somali Architecture project is how it uses modern technology—3-D modeling, Instagram, and Snapchat—to explore and diffuse explorations of architecture and identity. As Shegow described, “A lot of people outside of the country, across the diaspora, feel distant from Somalia and don’t have anything that takes them back or closer.” Somali Architecture aims to remedy this by examining not just buildings but the context in which those buildings were built. “You might be examining one building but you are also examining the reason why the building is there,” he said, citing the National Theater and the Mogadishu Cathedral as examples.The National Theater, built as a present from Mao Zedong, first opened in 1967. For the next several decades it was a cultural hub in the capital, but when the civil war broke out in 1991, the theater was one of the first buildings to be severely damaged. During the war period, the building took on a new function; instead of a place for music, plays, and dance, it became a storage space for weapons. In 2012, the theater reopened its doors, but just one week later, during an official ceremony, a bomb blast killed some of the country’s top sports officials and members of the Olympic committee. Al Shabab claimed responsibility for the attack.Somalia's National Theatre. A film by Said Fadhaye from DIIRAD FILMS on Vimeo.In a short documentary about the theater made by Somali filmmaker Said Fadhaye, Binti Omar Ga’al, a singer who performed with the legendary Waaberi band at the theater before the country’s civil war, watches archival footage of one of her concerts. Her voice is gorgeous, haunting, and at the end of the clip she is overcome with emotion. “It reminds me of the good days when I first sang this song; how I felt at the time and the people who were sitting in front of me inside the theater,” she said. “People were passionate about arts. They would queue up during the daytime. Tickets would run out as they waited in the queue and they would be told [to] come back tomorrow.”Though the future of the theater remains uncertain, it is among the buildings slated for renewal under a cooperation agreement signed between the Chinese and Somali governments in 2013. For many Somalis, the building is an icon, a remnant of how much was lost but also how much potential remains. As Fadhaye describes in his film, the building is a “symbol of a broken nation with a big hole in its heart.”The Mogadishu Cathedral is another structure showcased on the website of Somali Architecture. A stark reminder of the country’s colonial past, the cathedral was designed by Italian architect Vandone di Cortemilia and inaugurated in 1928. The civil war largely destroyed the cathedral, and while the tower bells and roof are entirely gone, the walls and part of the west facade remain. In addition to posting archival photos and a 3-D model of how the cathedral once was on their site, Somali architecture has proposed a plan to keep the “traces” of the cathedral—notably the bullet-ridden walls—while transforming the space into a complex that includes a public garden and a war museum.According to the group, transforming the cathedral into a war museum would be an act of both preservation and progress, key in rebuilding a society shattered, physically and psychically, after decades of war. As Somali Architecture describes on their website, “The War Museum could be much more than just a museum: it would be a real educational hub where people can learn about the history of Somalia. History is both interpretation of facts and memory. It is fundamental to let the youngest and future generations understand the importance of history to give them the right tools to think and act well in daily life. History belongs to all of us, and considering Somalia’s future development without taking into account its history means to transform us into orphans of the past.”This fall, the Somali architecture team displayed their work at the London Design Biennale. “It was a good opportunity to show worldwide what’s going on in Somalia in terms of architecture—what use to be here, and what remains.” International interest in the team’s work continues to grow. Following the exhibit in London, UNESCO expressed interest in bringing an exhibit to their headquarters in Paris. For now, Shegow and his team will continue to do their work, rebuilding the past through 3-D models and, they hope, actively participating the rebuilding of their country. “We’re looking forward to seeing where this journey takes us,” he said.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Aerospace researchers in Japan up to three retractions

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A pair of researchers in Japan has lost their third paper in a UK journal, which cites problematic images and an institutional investigation for the move. The 2016 article, “Novel Rh-substituted hexaaluminate catalysts for N2O decomposition,” was written by Rachid Amrousse and Akimasa Tsutsumi, of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, or JAXA, in Sagamihara. It … Continue reading Aerospace researchers in Japan up to three retractions

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Falling Walls: New Materials for a New Age

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

You probably haven’t heard of “multiferroics,” but they could lead to entirely new ways of designing technologies, some of which we are only just starting to imagine -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Rise of the Urban Power Couple

14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5196
14 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4922

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

In the popular imagination, cities are for young, educated single people, who flock there after college seeking fun, other singles, and more abundant job opportunities. There’s even a term for this back-to-the-city movement: “youthification.” Once the singles are married off and kids enter the picture, the popular narrative goes, their priorities change, and these same folks head out to the suburbs for more space, bigger back yards, and better schools.But in fact, “power couples” are a big factor in the back-to-the-city movement as well. The phrase brings to mind celebrity couples like Beyoncé and Jay-Z, Kim and Kanye, and J-Lo and A-Rod (or some other pair bestowed with a funny moniker). Among researchers, “power couples” refers to a broader phenomenon of well-educated, high-earning pairs, typically defined as couples where both partners hold a college degree. Power couples are associated with the concept of assortative mating, which describes how people of similar backgrounds—and especially those who are better educated and higher-earning—tend to partner with and marry one another.The urban preference of power couples is not a new phenomenon. A pioneering study of the locational proclivities of power couples, by the academic power couple of Dora Costa and Matthew Kahn, tracked their geography over the 50-year period spanning 1940 and 1990—before the big acceleration in the back-to-the-city trend after the year 2000. It found that power couples increasingly chose to locate in larger cities and large metro areas (those with 2 million or more people). The share of power couples living in large metros rose from a third in 1940 to nearly half (48 percent) by 1990.A new study brings the numbers up to date, tracking the location of power couples from 2008 to 2014, when the back-to-the-city movement kicked into high gear. The study sheds important new light on the geography of power couples by comparing three kinds of couples: full power couples, in which both spouses have a college degree; couples where only one spouse has a college degree; and couples where neither spouse has a college degree. (The study looks at native-born, male–female married couples only.) Costa and Kahn used even more detailed data on these couples from the Census’s American Community Survey (ACS), covering more than 300 metros for the period 2008 to 2014.Not surprisingly, full power couples are significantly more likely to live in large, highly educated cities or metro areas than other types of couples. More than 40 percent (42 percent) of these couples are found in large cities, compared to about 30 percent of couples where just the husband (32 percent) or just the wife (31 percent) graduated from college. Only a quarter of couples where neither spouse graduated college lived in large, highly educated cities.On the flip side, just 2 percent of full power couples lived in the smallest, least-educated cities or metro areas—reflective of the increased geographic sorting and inequality we see across America. (The study measures human capital in cities as the percentage of college graduates.)Share of Full Power Couples by Cities’ Human Capital and SizeHigh human capitalMedium human capitalLow human capitalLarge cities42%7%0%Medium cities15%16%4%Small cities4%2%2%Rural0%1%8%This same general pattern holds for couples that move from one city to another. Roughly a third (32 percent) of full power couples that relocated between 2008 and 2014 moved to the largest and most highly educated metros, compared to about a quarter of husband-only and wife-only power couples, and less than a fifth of couples where neither partner graduated from college. Just 2 percent of full power couples moved to the smallest, least educated places in America.Share of Full-Power-Couple Movers by Cities’ Human Capital and SizeHigh Human CapitalMedium Human CapitalLow Human CapitalLarge Cities32%7%0%Medium Cities18%17%4%Small Cities5%3%2%Rural0%1%10%Furthermore, the study finds consistent evidence that both men and women in full power couples are financially better off in large, educated cities, which offer better jobs and higher wages for them.But what happens to couples in which just the husband or just the wife has a college degree?The study finds considerable evidence of a distinct gender bias in how different types of couples fare in large cities. Full power couples do better in larger, more educated cities. Power couples where just the husband has a college degree also are better off in larger, more educated cities.But the pattern is different when only the wife has a degree—they are not necessarily better off in those cities. Furthermore, when the woman has the degree, its effect on them moving to a large city rather than a small one is not large enough for researchers to conclude it isn’t due to random chance.There are a number of potential reasons for this. Perhaps it is, as the study conjectures, that larger, more educated cities offer fewer opportunities for less educated men. Or perhaps it is due to the well-documented gender gap in wages for knowledge-based and professional jobs, and the women in some power couples do not earn enough to make it worthwhile to live in bigger, more expensive cities.It could be that women who choose less educated male partners do so in part because they have different locational preferences than women who marry college-educated men. They may prefer small-town life to big-city living, or want to stay close to family. Or, despite the belief that there is less of a gender-based division of labor among college-educated couples, perhaps it is still the case that a non-trivial number of college-educated women take their locational cues from the male partner’s career.But any way you slice it, when it comes to the geography of power couples, gender continues to matter.CityLab editorial fellow Nicole Javorsky contributed research and editorial assistance for this article.

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