Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: E. coli’s adaptation to extreme temperatures helps explain resistance to certain drugs

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A new study suggests that defenses against extreme temperatures give E. coli bacteria an advantage in fending off certain drugs. The work could help doctors administer antibiotics in a more precise way.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Science News Briefs From Around the World

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A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Blood Moon vs. Supermoon: Which is Rarer?

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What do all of these special-sounding moon terms really mean?

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Overdose deaths up in NYC; fentanyl most common substance identified, report says

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In the country’s largest city, confirmed drug overdose deaths are up over a year ago — and still at epidemic levels — but the rate of deaths has slowed down, according to a report Monday.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Tonight: Watch SpaceX Announce Its First Passenger to the Moon

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Here's how to watch live as CEO Elon Musk reveals the first customer it will take to the moon aboard its BFR rocket, among other details.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: What Brazil Really Lost in the Fire

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10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

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When Brazil’s National Museum was consumed by fire on the night of Sunday, September 3, I saw a part of my childhood going up in flames with it.Like countless others who grew up in Rio de Janeiro, I’d first visited the museum as a small child. São Cristóvão Palace, home of the museum since 1892, is a beautiful neoclassical building located in Quinta da Boa Vista, a large park in the city’s Zona Norte, where I was raised. Rio’s less-affluent north side lacks the amenities that are concentrated in the more heavily touristed Zona Sul; as a result, the majority of cultural spaces in the city are difficult for less-privileged people to access.But even the poorest residents of Rio could visit the National Museum, which was near two train stations and was often one of the first (and sometimes the last) forms of contact this segment of the population would have with Brazilian science and history. The museum held a vast trove of more than 20 million items—Latin America’s largest anthropology and natural history collection. It was there that students from public schools, residents of distant neighborhoods, and the children of parents who could not afford to enter other cultural spaces in the city learned about the prehistoric animals that once inhabited our country. It was there that they took pride in the 12,000-year-old skeleton of Luzia, the oldest human remains ever found in the Americas. That precious artifact, like an estimated 90 percent of the museum’s collection, has been destroyed.An aerial view of Quinta da Boa Vista, with the gutted ruins of the National Museum in the foreground. (Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)Since the fire, Brazilians have been sharing emotional stories from their visits to museum as children, marveling at both the exhibits and at the National Museum itself. Built in 1803, the ornate palace was once the residence of the Portuguese royal family. Beyond its historical, cultural, and social importance, the museum, which was overseen by the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, was also a prestigious academic institution recognized in Brazil and internationally for the quality of its courses and scientific work.We may now be shocked at the destruction, but no Brazilian could truly claim to be surprised by this disaster. For decades, the once-grand palace had been showing signs of decay—exposed electrical wires in the galleries, an inadequate cooling system, floors and ceilings patched up with unsuitable materials. It lacked sprinklers and smoke detectors; nearby fire hydrants were dry. What was once a source of local and national pride has now become a symbol of Brazil’s failing infrastructure and ineffective local and national government.How did we get here? Why are we now weeping over the destruction of an asset of invaluable material and immaterial worth?In the wake of the fire, many guilty parties have been singled out, from the university that was responsible for the management of the building to the city’s firefighters, who lacked adequate training and supplies.But most Brazilians blame the government and the austerity policies of the current president of the republic, Michel Temer. Recently, an amendment was inserted in the text of the Federal Constitution, freezing public investments for 20 years. We have witnessed many long years of diminished federal funding for cultural and scientific institutions in the name of other public priorities. Consequently, the process of decay accelerated for institutions that depend almost entirely on public investment. Before the National Museum burned, it was subjected to decades of disinvestment. The Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, to which the museum belongs, has experienced seven fires at its facilities over the past seven years—three in 2018 alone. This is an ongoing campaign, not the result of accidents and misfortune, as some Brazilian officials have argued in recent days.  At least some blame must also go to the devaluation of culture in Brazil in general. We live in a country that has a weak connection to its history, a reflection of our inability to overcome the plunder and colonization in our past. In advance of the 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro and the Brazilian government spent billions on costly development projects, opening new landmarks like Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava’s Museum of Tomorrow and AquaRio, the largest aquarium in South America. Meanwhile, the city has allowed several other museums and historic structures to decay, such as the city’s former rail hub, Leopoldina Station, which has sat unused and vacant for more than a decade.In particular, we also have little concern for the educational and cultural resources provided for those living in poverty, thanks to Brazil’s perverse collective consensus that inequality is natural and success must come from individual merit-based effort.In Brazil today, producing science and culture is increasingly a political act, and an act of resistance. It means opposing the government’s austerity regime. It means hearing that you and your work are not important—that it’s better to just privatize everything. It means finding the strength to overcome systematic federal disinvestment. It means embracing a career that is both financially and socially undervalued. But above all, it means possessing the hope and strength to fight for better days.I was a child who was enchanted by the fossils in the museum, who once said that I wanted to be a paleontologist. I was the public school student who visited the museum with my class in elementary school. Years later, I was a student at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro who witnessed the university’s decline and lost the building where my classes were held to a fire. Today, I am a social scientist who went back to campus the day after the fire to help produce knowledge—a small step toward building a country that once again values education and science as pathways to a free and just society.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Thinking beyond yourself can make you more open to healthy lifestyle choices

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

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Many people feel threatened when reminded of their unhealthy behavior. However, a group of 220 sedentary adults became more receptive to health advice -- and more active -- after being primed to either think about their most important values or to make well-wishes for others.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Targeting this key bacterial molecule could reduce the need for antibiotics

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

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Scientists have shown that cellulose serves a mortar-like role to enhance the adhesion of bacteria to bladder cells, causing urinary tract infections.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: How Boston Got Its ‘T’

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The history of mass transit in the United States begins in Boston, when, in 1631, a chartered ferry service began taking passengers between Charlestown and the Shawmut Peninsula. Two and half centuries and many horse-driven carriages later, Boston had the nation’s first underground rail system.By the 1960s, when architect and designer Peter Chermayeff and his team of designers were asked to come up with a simple set of design rules for the region’s subways, streetcars, and buses, even more had changed. The state government took over the the city’s mass transit services in 1947, establishing the Metropolitan Transit Authority. And in 1963, regional services for 78 municipalities were all placed under one umbrella, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA).During that decade, Boston was beginning to shed its reputation as a stifling backwater. Bold, modern buildings by contemporary architects sprouted up throughout the city, including the New England Aquarium. Chermayeff and his group, CambridgeSeven Associates, started work on the design for the major harbor attraction in 1962. Three years later, they were asked by the MBTA to help make their service more attractive and easier to navigate.There were layers of history to wade through. The stations were dirty, the maps were hard to read, and only the most seasoned local could navigate it all with confidence.A sampling of what Peter Chermayeff and his design team came up with for the MBTA. (Chermayeff&Geismar&Haviv)While the work required many hands, Chermayeff led the charge, coming up with the idea to simply call the service “The T.” Tom Geismar, another CambridgeSeven partner (and a partner of the C&G&H design firm he founded with Peter’s brother, Ivan) created the lollipop logo for it. An exhaustive set of new rules for every last detail of the MBTA’s appearance followed.Boston-area straphangers don’t have much reason to love their underfunded and often frustrating public transit experience lately. But in the background remains a visual identity from the transit authority’s most optimistic (and well-funded) days that helps riders navigate the region with relative ease.CityLab caught up with Chermayeff and Geismar separately over the phone to take a closer look at how the MBTA’s current look came to be—and what it could have been had they truly had their way.How did you get the commission?Peter Chermayeff: The authority interviewed us to do the environmental design work back in 1965. Ridership was going to be affected by information orientation and graphics were going to play a major role. We were excited to work on it—Boston’s subway is a major enterprise of civic importance, not so much with architecture as environmental design.Their general manager, Rush Lincoln, was an Army guy who came from the Corps of Engineers. He ran the MBTA with military discipline. They had also retained Bob Keith, who was very enlightened planner. He had a background in transportation and an understanding that ridership depended on quality of experience, how people were treated, and how they felt on the system. I remember us all hitting it off and feeling like we were on the path to something extremely exciting.Boston’s Park Street subway station in  1964, just before Chermayeff’s makeover. (Frank Curtin/AP)We did a reconnaissance of every station. We came up with a methodology and an analysis method to address the user experience. We took thousands of photographs, we went through the rolling stock, the stations, the buses, the streetcars, the signage. Bob and Rush were encouraging us while we gained the respect of skeptical engineers who thought we were too young and knew nothing about transportation.We were immensely excited by the possibilities emerging from the project—to not only change experience of the rider, but to impact the whole city through it. When it was all said and done, we had produced six or seven massive books that were standards manuals for all of it: the station design, stairways, lighting, markings, signage, typography, arrows, map placement, endless series of diagrams, and details of materials to use. Looking back on my career, I would say what we did in those few years between ‘65 and ‘70 was one of the most gratifying assignments I ever took on.  What was your assessment of the system?Chermayeff: It had a terrific infrastructure. The service was effective and good in many ways. I was impressed by its organization but troubled by how it looked and felt. We found that the information people were given from station to station was very confusing. It was all out of date and the maps were illegible. It was poorly lit and dirty. There was a litter of confusing signage and if you weren’t a local you’d likely get lost trying to find your way into or out of a station.Peter Chermayeff’s team came up with simple, clear design solutions that made Boston’s mass transit easier to navigate. (Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv)So what did you come up with?Chermayeff: One common ground in our analysis was that we could transform the entire system by simply helping people figure out where they were and where they were going. Orientation became a driving concept and a guiding principle. We gave structure to the information system and how it would apply, architecturally.We also wanted to establish the identity of the system and flag it in the streetscape. People had an affinity for the song “Charlie on the MTA” and the name change to “MBTA” was too long. Our core team started thinking about different ways to make something work and eventually came up with simple “T.” It made sense as a name and image that would apply and be understandable at a distance or in conversation. It connects with all the words associated with the service: “transit,” “transportation,” “tunnel,” “tube,” and so on. It made all the sense in the world to go with “T” and have it displayed in a lollipop logo on trains, buildings, and streets. Tom worked the logo out in great detail. We were unflinching in our recognition that this was not a truly original idea. Stockholm had already had a black “T” in a white circle for the Tunnelbana. It wasn’t necessary for us to be original, just to be right. The lines themselves lacked identity, so we thought that color coding them would make huge difference. We applied the same process to all four lines. They had been identified by terminus, but most of those names were unclear to non-locals. I remember sitting in my Cambridge office preparing for a meeting with the MBTA in which I would be proposing colored lines. I had markers in front of me and I chose red for the line that went to Harvard since it’s a well-known institution whose main color is crimson. One line went up the North Shore of Boston up to the coastal areas, so it seemed obvious to call that the Blue Line. The line that serves Olmsted’s Emerald Necklace was an obvious choice for green. And then the fourth line ended up being orange for no particular reason beyond color balance. This was 20 years before the Silver Line was added.That allowed us to give lines understood names. Instead of Harvard-Ashmont—no one visiting Boston knows what Ashmont is—now you have the Red Line. The presence of color reinforces that identity to help people find their way around.Arlington station was used as a  pilot modernization by the design team. (Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv)It became clear that the most important thing to have as a governing component of a station is an identification with its color and name seen at all times. When you look out the window from the train and see a green band through each station you’re reminded you’re on the Green Line. That band of green at the top of the wall along platform would be seen from a train and we thought that should be dominant component. But if you’re a standee, your eye level is likely too high to see the band at the top of the station nameplate. So we put another band down low about a foot off the floor with the station name repeated. By adding a white band with the station name band we could provide information for street exits with arrows. And we could provide further info to passengers on the platform by putting maps in between those bands.Were you able to do anything about the architecture of the old stations?Chermayeff: A lot of them were dreary. Most of the them were underground, so if we lit them well the architecture would be palpable again. We could give them particular identification by relating the walls to the outside.Arlington station was a pilot modernization. We asked a friend, Len Gittleman, who was a designer and an architectural photographer, to make high-contrast photos of the area above that could be made into silkscreen murals on indestructible porcelain panels. He worked out many images that conjured up place-specific imagery for riders. So you might not be able to actually see these places from the platform but the images make it felt. If you’re riding on the train, you don’t even have to look for the station name—you just see the images go by and you know where you are. Inside Arlington station. The design team had architectural photographer Len Gittleman take high contrast photos of station surroundings that could be made into silkscreen murals on porcelain panels along the platforms. (Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv)We wanted to get natural light into the stations and urged in our guidelines to do that wherever possible in order to make the city feel like a part of each station. We also liked the idea that the skeleton of the city could become legible through its subway. Most people tended to not know where the subway was as they drove or even walked around. But by making station entrances with bands of color, you see a reminder that the system is underneath. At stations like Washington and at Park Street, where the Red and Green lines intersect, you feel it, you know where the line is going. That, along with the lollipop, were continuous, subtle reminders. The legibility added to an urban identity any Bostonians now thinks of almost subconsciously.In our reconnaissance, we’d watch people go up to the old turnstiles, put a coin in the wrong one and run into the bar. We solved that problem by having the MBTA purchase ones with [a clear difference between] each one’s left and right side. People were also running into the one-way gate, so we redesigned it to make them more transparent and obvious to operate. All the maps and station orientation signage we did became good architecture through clarity of movement. Orientation was everything. It wasn’t about being pretty, or just interesting for architecture’s sake. It was about clarity, history, and place.Inside Arlington station. An area map and a system map are visible along the platform wall. By having the station name along the floor, riders standing inside passing trains could see what station they were pulling into without having to bend down. (Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv)What was the most innovative or unique solution you came up with?Tom Geismar: I think it was the whole package. The system map we developed was quite different from the old one—stylized and choosing clarity over geographic accuracy, like London’s. The maps relate to the signage with regards to lettering, colors, and symbols. I liked the “T” symbol because of its simplicity and the words it plays off of. It was all part of a clear system down to the smallest detail.Chermayeff: The map became quite iconic and it has been interesting to see it change and evolve over time. It’s become a bit more complex with the additions of a Silver and a Purple line. But it’s still holding on to its early beginnings which I think speaks to strength of what Tom and I—and their office—came up with.There were quite a few notable environmental design projects around this time for mass transit. Were you in touch with people like Lance Wyman, Bob Noorda, or Massimo Vignelli about their own, similar work?Chermayeff: There was a little bit of awareness between all of us, I suppose. Pentagram in London was developing similar typography for signage projects and at one point we were comparing our arrow designs with each other. Vignelli was using color and typography in a similar way at the time. But we weren’t influencing each other.What were some unrealized ideas for the system that you’re still proud of?Chermayeff: We had the idea of emphasizing “inbound” versus “outbound” at every station platform in order to prevent people from going the wrong way. We wanted to have orange and red stripes on the end walls to indicate inbound and blue and green end walls for outbound. I thought that would have added nicely to our standards for typography, line colors, and signage. At one point we were also asked to come up with a way of visually unifying the entire fleet. We thought it would make sense to make all of the buses and trains be neutral in color—to have silver, gray, black, and white be the overall scheme but then make the doors bright yellow, which would help guide people to the right spot to board in poor visibility. The idea actually was applied for five, maybe 10 years, but some people didn’t like it. They eventually color coordinated their rail cars with the lines they serviced.Inside a full-sized model of the train car that Chermayeff’s team worked on with Lou Bakanowsky. It was eventually rejected for budget reasons, but he hopes it’ll be revisited. (Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv)Between 1975 and 1980 we were asked to come up with a design for new rail cars and we came up with something that was timeless. Lou Bakanowsky, who led the effort, worked out a round, almost loaf-of-bread-like approach. It was very elegant and disciplined, from the windows to the seating to the advertising. When the bids came in, ours was found to cost about 10 percent more than the MBTA just doing it same old way as before. They decided they couldn’t justify that 10 percent. It was a huge disappointment but I’d like to think that at some point in the future that they might revisit our design in some way.How has the MBTA treated your vision since?Geismar: There were discussions between the MBTA and CambridgeSeven as recently as 10 years ago about various aspects. But the MBTA subsequently developed their own design department, which has been carrying it out since. People in the department were concerned that too many things were being let go or not done correctly.We’ve had discussions with them over the years, but the general responsibility of the program became an internal matter. They’ve continued working with different architects on different projects and generally adhere to the basic standards. There’s a lot of good stuff there. But I do think it’s starting to lose some of its consistency and there’s a lack of maintenance.I’ve never been happy with the way they implemented the “T” symbol on things. I always felt the black ring around it was an integral part of it, so if you put it out on a sign on the street there should be white around the whole thing—the black ring shouldn’t be the frame of the design.Chermayeff: Some of the strong guidelines we advocated for got lost a bit. I feel disappointed that the administrators running it over the years have allowed the rolling stock to be given colors of the lines—it diminishes the impact of the line color system. More important than that, I’m disappointed most by how they’ve allowed architects to deviate from our approach to the station architecture and start using materials, color, architectural form in arbitrary ways that have nothing to do with our notion of urban place, of reinforcing a sense of where you are where you’re going.Park Street was done in a confusing way that deviated from our guidelines with regards to tiles and colors. Other stations follow the guidelines, but Park Street is one of the system’s most important ones. The design guidelines, when followed, give a sense of unity and diversity. It’s important that not everything look the same but it should not be arbitrarily idiosyncratic. That being said, I think it has held together well overall.Do you contact the MBTA to help them correct a misinterpretation of your system?Chermayeff: We have done that a bit. I remember complaining about how one of the T’s was being applied and so they redid it. But in other cases, we’ve just let it be. I’d love to see the public doing more of that, though.What lessons did you take from the MBTA project that helped out with other work?Geismar: We never worked on another transit project. We were just trying to do things that were logical, informative, and interactive. We’ve done for other clients, but nothing quite as complex. A lot of people contributed ideas but what was interesting to me was the clarification of the underground passages that make the experience easier. Peter was the one with the big ideas for it, especially in terms of communications.Chermayeff: My signage and graphics have been hugely influenced by what we did there. Also in architecture, where information is clearly developed as part of a building system. The approach to graphics, the usage of light, the volume of space, the reinforcement of place, and the creation of a special identity in buildings are all critical. That desire to make each place resonate or be rewarding is something I’ve been perusing for decades, and a lot of it started with the MBTA.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Warming Boosted Florence’s Rainfall, One Expert Says

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

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The hurricane was likely fueled by some of the warmer spots in the Atlantic Oceans this year -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Can Banning Privatization Keep Water Cheap, Safe, and Flowing?

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Privatizing a city’s water system tends to produce a dual outcome: Pipes, once rusty, get sleek; rates get steep. When water went private in Bayonne, New Jersey, local ratepayers started paying an extra 28 percent for water; and in Middletown, Pennsylvania, privatization meant an 11.5 percent surcharge (and officials are suing the utility to stop it).This November, amid fears that their city will meet the same fate, voters in Baltimore will decide on an initiative that would ban water privatization preemptively. They’d be the first major city to do it.Aging pipes in Baltimore’s more than 100-year-old water and sewer systems require intensive maintenance help that leaks billions of dollars from the city. A consent decree served by the Environmental Protection Agency to eliminate sanitary sewer overflows by 2033 will cost the city another $1.6 billion.“In Baltimore city we’re already at a crisis point with the affordability of water,” said Rianna Eckel, a Maryland organizer for Food & Water Watch and Food & Water Action. “Unfortunately there wasn’t a lot of preventative and proactive maintenance done.”For now, it’s Baltimore residents that are paying the price. In 2015, more than a third of the city was paying at least 3 percent of their household income to water bills, brushing against the United Nations’ suggested maximum threshold for water affordability. On July 1, 2018, another rate hike increased water and sewer rates by an average of 13.9 percent—and increases are projected to continue until 2023.High water bills lead to unpaid water bills, which in Baltimore can put residents on the road to eviction. As CityLab previously reported, an old Maryland law meant that until last December, Baltimore residents who had outstanding water fines and failed to pay a tax lien could see their homes put up for tax sale. Since then, an executive order passed by Baltimore mayor Catherine Pugh has ensured that water fines can’t be the single deciding factor in a tax sale—“a huge victory,” said Eckel, but it’s an impermanent one: The moratorium only applies on tax sales in 2018.To improve public infrastructure in places like Baltimore—and, in the process, potentially reduce the inefficiencies that cause those mounting costs—the Trump administration has encouraged private companies to take the systems over. Research has shown that privately owned utility companies are more likely to make politically unpopular but critical investments, and that they comply better than public utilities do with federal regulations. But, critics of privatization say, they are less sensitive to the circumstances of low-income customers and don’t have an incentive to encourage water conservation.Baltimore’s bill wasn’t responding to any one privatization offer in particular, says Lester Davis, a spokesperson for the city council president. But “the threat of water privatization is nothing new in Baltimore city,” Eckel said. Most recently, the private utility company Suez Environment has repeatedly approached Baltimore city council members and the mayor about leasing their water system, offering the city several potential contracts, including one that would bind the city to a 40 to 50-year lease. In return, the city would get much-needed modernizations of the system.But advocates warn that the sweet deal they’re pitching also comes with a hidden cost. According to Food and Water Watch, a switch to a privately owned water company amounts to a 59 percent increase in water service costs, or $185 more per year, and an average water rate increase of 18 percent every other year.Those rate hikes are necessary to offset the cost of investment cities have been putting off for years, says Rich Henning, a spokesperson for Suez Environment. “It’s difficult sometimes to put money in underground infrastructure because no one is going to see the improvement,” he said. Instead, they wait until it’s broken to fix it. But often, that’s too late.“People say, ‘Oh my god, rates are going up because of them,’” Henning said, referring to a private company’s entrance into a municipality. “No, rates are going up because you’re investing in infrastructure… There’s going to need to be a day where you have to invest, because otherwise your system is going to fall apart.” Private companies charge what they charge to bring water systems up to code, he says, and to prepare the system for the future.A tepid critique of the bill penned by the Baltimore Sun’s Editorial Board gets at the heart of this tension. Sure, pass the bill, they wrote—but that alone won’t solve Baltimore’s water crisis:[W]hat we should not do is pretend that banning privatization actually solves anything. City rate payers are still being squeezed by the costs of infrastructure, billing is still haphazard, and conflict remains over this regional resource… Rather than worrying about a sale of the water system that nobody is advocating, Baltimore officials should use it as an entree into a broader conversation with the suburban counties over regional issues, from education to housing to public transportation.But, says Davis, worrying about the sale now means they won’t have to worry later. If Baltimore voters pass the measure in November, they’ll be the first to have a ban written into their city charter, meaning it will be harder to undo. (Northampton, Massachusetts, passed an ordinance banning privatization in 2016.) “We wanted to close the door on this as far as it even being remotely possible,” said Davis. “The tax payers should not be subjected to the whims of the private sector.”“Water is an essential element,” he continued. “If corners are cut or things are done wrong it can be a life or death situation.”

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Baby-aspirin risks overwhelm benefits in healthy elderly

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

In healthy elderly people who never had a heart attack, the widespread practice of taking a baby aspirin every day may do more harm than good, according to a U.S.-Australian study of more than 19,000 volunteers.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Here’s the Data Behind Apple’s New Heart Monitoring App

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

FDA is reviewing evidence from hundreds of people that used the company’s watch -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Household cleaning products may be making children fat, study suggests

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Everyday household cleaning products may be producing unintended consequences for children after a study found that disinfectants have the ability to change gut bacteria, potentially leading to higher body mass index (BMI).

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: CityLab Daily: Take a Trip to ‘Nostalgiaville’

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

What We’re FollowingMemory lane: In a warehouse in Chula Vista, California, there’s an idealized 1950s town, complete with details like jukeboxes, rotary phones, and even a Ford Thunderbird. At first it might sound like a nostalgic playground, but it’s on an important mission to help people with dementia recall their past.Built and operated by the George G. Glenner Alzheimer’s Family Centers, this first “memory town” aims to stimulate memories for patients through “reminiscence therapy.” The model town square offers seniors a quasi-urban experience, with a diner, a movie theater, a pet store, a park-like square, and even a city hall decked out in vintage style. The diner in Town Square. (Senior Helpers)Soon, Glenner Centers plans to take the concept beyond the warehouse. Do fake towns like this betray how we’ve failed to build age-friendly cities in the first place? CityLab’s Amanda Kolson Hurley looks at what a fake town for dementia tells us about urban design.—Andrew SmallMore on CityLabIn Toronto, Ford Nation Strikes Back Doug Ford, the brother of the late and disgraced former mayor of Toronto, Rob Ford, has thrown a local election into chaos.Chris BatemanHurricane Florence Threatens Property Ties in Carolina’s Lowcountry Thousands of acres throughout the flooded Carolinas are heir’s property, a form of land ownership that leaves residents vulnerable to speculators.Laura BlissWhat Worker Wouldn’t Move to Scandinavia in America? Chasing an HQ2 is a dying model. As the nature of working changes, U.S. cities that provide workers with the support that companies once did, will prosper.Lev KushnerMapping Skopje’s Modernism An earthquake hit the city in July 1963, killing over 1,000 people and leaving 200,000 homeless. The inventive, vernacular-influenced designs behind the rebuild are worth celebrating.Feargus O'SullivanTeacher Wages Are Lower Than Ever It’s not just that paychecks are shrinking. It’s that the advantages teachers once had are reversing.Sarah HolderWhat We’re ReadingHurricane Florence’s surge is expected to hit homes that already cost the government millions (ProPublica)Vision Zero: Has the drive to eliminate traffic deaths lost its way? (The Guardian)Why the trial of the Chicago officer who shot Laquan Mcdonald matters (New York Times)Meet the twist-and-turning streetlamp of the future (Curbed)How local government became the hottest trend in fashion (GQ)Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Number of New Heroin Users Drops, But Overdose Deaths Continue to Climb

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Government data provides fresh snapshot of annual drug use behavior -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: ‘Trail to Zero’ horseback ride raises awareness for veteran suicides, provides therapeutic relief

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Military veterans and their family members mounted horses on Saturday for the second annual “Trail to Zero” ride through Manhattan in order to raise awareness for the high suicide rate in their community.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: To End Poverty, Increase Access to Energy

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Concern about climate change has unintended consequences for the most impoverished countries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Never-before-seen features found around a neutron star

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

An unusual infrared light emission from a nearby neutron star detected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope could indicate new features never before seen.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Scientists determine four personality types based on new data

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4975
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4701

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Researchers have sifted through data from more than 1.5 million questionnaire respondents and found at least four distinct clusters of personality types exist: average, reserved, self-centered and role model. They are based on the five widely accepted basic personality traits: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. The findings challenge existing paradigms in psychology and potentially could be of interest to hiring managers and mental health care providers.