Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Florida veteran, 93, survives flesh-eating bacteria

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

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A Florida veteran is making a strong recovery after contracting flesh-eating bacteria in his leg last month while on his daily walk on the beach.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Terry Bradshaw aces pronunciation of pneumococcal pneumonia for new campaign: ‘I knocked it out of the park’

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

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NFL legend and Fox broadcaster Terry Bradshaw has a new gig, helping educate Baby boomers about pneumococcal pneumonia in a partnership with Pfizer and the Hall of fame quarterback has already aced the first challenge: pronouncing the name of the a potentially serious bacterial lung disease.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Closest Exoplanet to Earth Could Be “Highly Habitable”

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

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A new study suggests Proxima Centauri could sustain liquid water on its surface -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: NIMBYs Sure Hate Developers. But Why?

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NIMBYs—foes of new development, especially the kind that’s located near their backyards—are often described as risk averse. Building more housing in their neighborhoods, they worry, could lead to more traffic, lower property values, strained services, lost parking places, lower and/or higher rents, and all manner of undesirable changes to “neighborhood character.”But, according to a study out of UCLA, their resistance to development might have another, more straightforward explanation: They hate developers.More specifically, they don’t like to see developers make a buck from their efforts. Based on a survey of 1,300 L.A. county residents, researchers Paavo Monkkonen and Michael Manville found that residents were 20 percent more likely to be anti-development when they see that developers will turn a nice profit. In other words, NIMBYs might be driven to oppose building more housing not by “fear of their own losses, but resentment of others’ gains.” This, the authors write, “suggests a separate dimension of NIMBYism, centered less on risk aversion and more on enforcing community norms of fairness.”What’s with this? We don’t wish ill upon those who make our pancakes or our hats—why all the haterade for the nice people who make our houses and apartments? The evil-developer trope seems to be baked into the culture. Movies like It’s a Wonderful Life frame builders as bulldozing antagonists; Donald Trump epitomized the brand in his real-estate career and now, the presidency. “The word ‘developer is frequently preceded by adjectives like ‘greedy’ or ‘rapacious,” reads the study, and they’re often “framed as adversaries rather than partners.”And developer-hating isn’t just a contemporary expression of late-capitalist critique: Senators in Ancient Rome were complaining about density, and blaming developers for it.The study also posits that the perceptions of developers as money-grubbing villains are made worse in supply-constrained, pricey, and tightly-regulated housing markets. When city policies and zoning regulations make development more difficult, the developers who prosper are more likely to be the richest, nastiest, and most aggressive. “Our system of land use regulations and permitting process—the complexity of it—has selected for people that can navigate that,” said Monkkonen. “They tend to be good at bending the rules and breaking the rules, or wealthy. We’ve created a system that selects for people who are more cutthroat.”Cities are thus confronted with a paradox: Deregulating land use would allow developers unfettered access to space, letting them potentially wreak havoc on neighborhoods. But enacting policies that make development difficult only encourage more “evil” developers, which in turn makes developers seem more evil. From the report:The result could be a self-fulfilling process that fulfills people’s worst expectations: communities suspicious of development clamp down on it, partly because they believe developers are rich and confrontational, and by clamping down they increase the probability that developers will be rich and confrontational.This effect is particularly pronounced in markets where housing is out of reach for many of the area’s poorest residents—as in the Bay Area. Here, profiting off a project seems “morally inappropriate,” the study states, even if the end result is more affordable housing. This creates what Monkkonen and others call a “repugnant market.”These preconceived notions appear to have contributed to respondents’ negative attitudes towards the YIMBY dream of building more housing.To conduct the study, people were sorted into experimental groups based on whether they lived in primarily single-family, low-rise multifamily, or high-rise housing (and control groups of each). Then they were presented with a development pitch “framed” by one of an assortment of different arguments against it (traffic and parking, neighborhood character, strain on services, and finally, developer profit) and asked to decide whether they supported, opposed, or were indifferent to the project.The results? Almost half (48 percent) of those who were told about the developers’ potentially large profit opposed the development, versus only 28 percent in the control group. The differences were smaller for those presented with the neighborhood character, services, and traffic/parking arguments—15, 10, and 10 percentage points, respectively.“It was surprising that the development process elicits [almost] the same opposition as neighborhood character,” said Monkkonen. “’Neighborhood character’ captures whatever people project onto that: For different people, it could mean traffic, or density, or people coming into a neighborhood.” And it’s often a coded way to justify discrimination, driven by class- and race-based biases. Whether the developer makes any money or not doesn’t affect your life, whereas neighborhood character—whatever it means to you—presumably does. Still, it elicited a stronger personal response.Other, less-surprising findings emerged, too, like: Buildings in their neighborhood were more offensive than buildings elsewhere. (Hence the “B”in NIMBY).But the study wasn’t entirely conclusive, Monkkonen says. By making the development frame about the process as a whole—the question posed to respondents suggests that the city gave the developer a special permit to build at a higher density than usual—they’ve partly conflated a distrust in government with a distrust in development. The question was inspired by Measure S, a NIMBYish ballot initiative proposed last year in L.A. that would have introduced more housing restrictions and was fueled by accusations that City Hall was in developers’ pockets. (The measure was ultimately rejected.) Monkkonen and his UCLA colleagues are planning on conducting a follow-up study that would disentangle the developers’ profit with the city planners’ corruption, in an effort to better isolate each evil.Still, there are some takeaways here for cities that want to encourage more affordable housing development. The solution, luckily, does not involve attempting to reverse the reputation of developers, as they are probably beyond redemption, brand-wise. But it could end up being the same proposals that YIMBYs put forth to achieve their pro-housing goals that could also help developers’ images. (Indeed, a common insult flung at YIMBYs is that they’re too pro-development for their own good.)Monkkonen points to “re-regulation” as a start: removing some of the exclusionary zoning policies that even Ben Carson condemns and allowing more multi-family housing units to emerge in places like L.A. and San Francisco, where housing is expensive and supply isn’t growing fast enough to meet demand. Make less-expensive housing legal and more developers will build it, the argument goes—and not just the fat-cigar developers people know and loathe. If it gets easier to build three- or four-story condo buildings, mom-and-pop developers could find it more feasible to enter the housing market. And everyone loves moms and pops.Another—albeit less plausibly achieved—boost to the developers’ reps would be to continue to encourage public housing development, especially in cities like L.A., where it’s increasingly uncommon. The history of public housing in the U.S. is fraught, but creating a new generation of well-built and maintained public housing “could potentially create a positive image of developers as public servants.” Potentially! “One thing we’re trying to do is change the conversation a bit in terms of who’s making money for the housing crisis,” said Monkkonen. “Developers are the visible agents of change and seem to visibly profit off high rents, when in fact they’re making the lowest amount of money overall.” The ones who really make out like bandits, as property values rise? Those single-family homeowners who are working so hard to keep new development out.“Virtually everyone lives in a home built by a self-interested developer,” the study concludes. “Blocking the product to punish the producer has a visible short-term consequence that might look progressive (assuming the developer is in fact rich) but a less-visible long-term consequence that lands on vulnerable people everywhere.”

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Burning Man’s Mathematical Underbelly

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

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It’s mostly an art festival, but attendees are impressively fascinated with science and math -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Bodega Signmakers of New York

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New York City is covered in advertising, but nothing appeals so directly to the carnal desires of its denizens more than the tantalizing imagery adorning the exteriors of its corner markets and bodegas.Within these magnificent collages, immediate satisfaction is promised through a cacophony of deli meats, sodas, cigarettes, and toiletries. It’s a ubiquitous art form in New York that embodies the id of the five boroughs: big, bold, loud, and infused with all kinds of innuendo.From a graphic design perspective, it’s absolute madness and a beautiful maelstrom of copyright infringement. On a single store you’ll find pristine stock images of Marlboros crammed alongside stacks of pancakes, cans of cat food resting precariously underneath hordes of detergent and condiments, and a gargantuan pixelated roast beef sandwich hovering over Manhattan’s skyline. In this world, a warped Pringles can is as tall as the Empire State Building, and the city appears as a bountiful heaven full of junk food and beer.(Chris Maggio)The beckoning of this straightforward deli signage feels refreshing in the face of sly and intrusive trends in mainstream advertising. In order to get a better sense of how these curbside canvases come to be, CityLab talked turkey with some of the artisans behind them.Where do the photos for the signs come from? Do you have a database of food pictures?Johnathan David Bautista (a.k.a. "JB"), Bee Signs Manufacturers Inc.: Most of the photos are downloaded from Bing and Google. Stock photos, too. The clients don’t usually have the time to take professional photographs of their own products, but there are exceptions.Mohammad (no last name given), Medina Sign: I buy from ShutterStock, but mostly non-copyrighted photos I find from Google images.Miguel Ventura (a.k.a "Ventura"), Mr. Ventura Signs: I look for them on Google and I buy images on websites that provide photos. Then, I prepare them in Photoshop for the sign graphics.(Chris Maggio)Do you consider this an art form? Is there a particular project you’re most proud of?JB: Yes! Over the years, the window graphics for the bodegas have evolved, and now, most of them are beautifully decorated with these signs. There’s a 16x6-foot one I designed a year or so ago for Ocean Hill Deli in Brooklyn. It’s still displayed and I hope to see it up for a long time.Mohammad: Yes, indeed. There are many that I’m proud of. One I did recently on 135th Ave and Lefferts Blvd (KeyFood) is getting a lot of attention.Ventura: I believe that to make art, one has to like what they do. I feel proud of my work, my art, and the effort that I put into every sign I make. I give 100 percent so that the client feels that they have something original and exclusive.(Chris Maggio)Have you ever made a piece like this for yourself? To hang in your own house?JB: I have not. I would probably eat nonstop if I had something like this hanging in my home.Mohammad: Yes. I actually do fine art (realism), so I have a few paintings around the house.Ventura: I have several pieces that I've put on the walls of my house including one of New York’s skyline and another of the Eiffel Tower.It seems like the idea behind most signs is to cram as many products into them as possible—do you think it’s important to show everything in the store?JB: That’s exactly the point! It’s a race between the bodegas. It’s not important to depict every product, but it is important to show variety. The customers will know they can walk in for every need.Mohammad: It’s what the customer wants, [so the Bodega owners]  feel they need to show all the items in the store. I personally dislike their choice and taste. Its looks, as you say, crammed. Showing everything defeats the purpose of marketing. I would prefer much fewer items to be displayed, like what McDonalds and Dunkin’ Donuts do—their wall graphics are not congested. Usually it’s just one picture and simple text.Ventura: That depends on the client and their preferences. But people today buy products that are promoted. If it’s not promoted, people won't know it’s in the store, so you have to show what you’re selling.(Chris Maggio)How have bodegas changed over the years? Was this kind of signage always a tradition? JB: They’ve modernized. Bodega ads used to concentrate more on selling tobacco, beer, and lottery tickets. Nowadays, everyone’s selling sandwiches, salads, and hot food. They have a more professional commercial display and people don’t loiter in front of these places as much anymore.Mohammad: They’ve evolved with time as all other businesses do. In the 80's and 90's they had traditional plexiglass with corrugated metal sheet awning. Now, it’s changeable LEDs, simpler text, and even better infrastructure inside the store.Ventura: The signs have changed quite a bit because there didn’t used to be printers that could make these kinds of graphics. The world of printing has changed marketing and the way that bodega owners promote themselves.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Dietary fiber reduces brain inflammation during aging

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As mammals age, immune cells in the brain known as microglia become chronically inflamed. In this state, they produce chemicals known to impair cognitive and motor function. That's one explanation for why memory fades and other brain functions decline during old age. But, according to a new study, there may be a remedy to delay the inevitable: dietary fiber.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: How skin begins: New research could improve skin grafts, and more

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Researchers have discovered a key mechanism by which skin begins to develop in embryos.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: We have more than enough calories, but what about other nutrients?

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A new study is the first to quantitatively map the flow of energy, protein, fat, essential amino acids and micronutrients from 'field-to-fork' at a global level and identify hotspots where nutrients are lost. The study shows that while we produce far more nutrients than is required for the global population, inefficiencies in the supply chain leave many people nutrient deficient.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Probiotic use may reduce antibiotic prescriptions

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The use of probiotics is linked to reduced need for antibiotic treatment in infants and children, according to a review of studies that probed the benefits of probiotics, co-led by a Georgetown investigator.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Irony? The Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention retracts a paper

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Irony machine, start your engine: A pair of engineers have lost a 2017 paper in the Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention over a failure to determine who owned the data. The article, “Solder selection for reflowing large ceramic substrates during PCB assembly,” was written by Prashant Reddy Gangidi and Noy Souriyasak, both listed as … Continue reading Irony? The Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention retracts a paper

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Cycling is Key to Safer, Healthier, More Vital Cities

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Frustrated by the obstacles to urban cycling in North America, Melissa and Chris Bruntlett traveled with their two kids from Vancouver to the Netherlands in 2016 to take a deep five-week dive into places that do cycling better. Traversing cities in the Netherlands by bike, they found that cycling is not just a better way to get around; when done right, it leads to healthier, safer, more vibrant, more family-friendly communities. They wrote it all up in their new book, Building the Cycling City: The Dutch Blueprint for Urban Vitality, which provides a guide for cities and communities that want to do cycling right, and for urban cyclists and families who want to learn the keys to cycling as a way of life.I spoke to the Bruntletts by phone earlier this month about what they’ve learned and about what cities and people in the United States and Canada can learn from the cycling lifestyle in the Netherlands. Our conversation has been lightly edited for space and flow.Why did you decide to go to the Netherlands and start cycling like the Dutch?Melissa: We lived so long experiencing cycling in Vancouver and telling a lot of great stories about what building cities for cycling can do. We felt that in order to really tell that story, we needed to go to the place where that is what people enjoy throughout the country and learn what has made them so successful.Sometimes critics of cycling say it's about “yuppies,” “hipsters,” and “the creative class,” and a force for “gentrification.” But your book talks more about the role of cycling for families and in building stronger communities. Chris:  Cycling plays a tremendous role in how we now look at cities for families. If it's not safe enough for our 8-year-old son, then it's just simply not good enough. I think for far too long in North America, we've made cycling acceptable for the “fit and the brave” that are willing to suit up and get on their bikes, but there are entire segments of the population that are completely ignored.M: What people overlook in those conversations are the people that can't drive. For anyone that is not of driving age, cycling is an independent means of transportation, so they don't need to rely on an adult or a bus. When we get older, there is a certain point when we may not be legally allowed to drive anymore. A lot of the conversation in terms of the elderly population is around aging in place. But it also includes the ability to still feel connected to their community, being able to go outside and travel comfortably even with limited mobility. Bicycles play a key part in that. It's less stress on the joints. It also affords elderly people a way move around the places where they have always lived and where they want to continue living. By saying that the infrastructure and the investment in cycling is only for the “fit and the brave” is to completely ignore entire swaths of our population and not afford them the same rights that we afford able-bodied people in their 20s and 30s.I remember when I was a boy growing up in New Jersey, my brother and I rode our 10 speeds everywhere. LeBron James recently said the thing that most affected his youth growing up in Akron, Ohio, was the ability to ride a bike everywhere. How can cycling help kids get a sense of the city or even a sense of freedom? C: The Netherlands ranks as having the happiest children in the world. That's not by accident. That's because they give them safe places to cycle and they trust kids to get from place to place without adult supervision. They don't quite have the stranger danger that we have. It's also because their streets are traffic-calmed, there's fewer cars, they're going slower. Kids are given a free reign to get around the city, whether it's by foot, bicycle, or bus.M: A lot of kids are getting less and less physical activity. And that simple bike ride to school is one of the easiest ways to build in 15-30 minutes of physical activity in a day and help them be a little bit healthier. The Dutch are one of the only advanced countries to reduce their obesity rate. It's not because they have the healthiest diets. It’s because they have built exercise into their day-to-day activity.I had a colleague from Sweden who visited Toronto and she said she wouldn't ride in Toronto or let her kids ride there, not just because of cars and inadequate bike lanes, but because the cyclists ride too fast—like they're in the Tour de France is how she put it. But as you point out in your book, cyclists in the Netherlands ride at a slower pace. Why is that important?C: I think that's an indication of how you build your streets. If you build hostile streets, people are going to want to keep up with car traffic and armor themselves up with protective equipment. There’s a differentiation in the Dutch language between a sports cyclist and a utilitarian cyclist; the two phrases loosely translate to “walking with wheels” versus “running with wheels.” The “wheeled walkers” make up the vast majority of people that bike in the Netherlands because they've created these conditions that aren't as hostile, so anybody feels like they can do it.A bakfiets is often used to transport largo cargo. (Modacity)Another point you make in the book that's so important is about the different kind of bikes Dutch cyclists ride. M: They're upright, they’re a little bit slower but they're meant for utility. They're meant to get them comfortably, without any complication, from point A to B, hauling some goods along the way or hauling children. Those utility bikes mean a lot in terms of simplifying the trip. They don't overcomplicate it. The bikes already come with all the gear, you don’t have to worry about buying lights or a bell separately. They're meant for day-to-day transportation.Why is the bike shop such an important part of the cycling environment?C: In Vancouver, the cycling shops were still very sport-focused. The staff weren't trained to sell bikes, they usually only have one or two collecting dust in the corner. Because the vast majority of people riding bikes in North America are doing it for sport and recreation, the retail industry is still playing catch up. It's almost become this chicken and egg scenario where they don't see a large market for transportation bikes so they're not putting many resources into developing that market. Bike sharing has kind of changed this a little bit, because people are riding these more upright utilitarian bikes. But if they ultimately want to invest in one, they have a real job on their hands trying to find one.In the book, you point out that a very small fraction of Dutch riders wear helmets, but the rate of injury and death from cycling is much lower. M: It's not even a part of the conversation in the Netherlands because they've engineered their streets to take out a lot of the possible stresses and risk of collisions that would inherently make people feel like they need the extra bit of safety. Less than 1 percent of the population in the Netherlands actually wears helmets, because they've got the investment in the safe infrastructure and safety in numbers.How much do the protected lanes matter, or are there other elements of the infrastructure that are of equal or more importance?M: In North America, a lot of the times we talk more about protected and fully separated infrastructure. But in the Netherlands, the conversation is actually much more about traffic calming. A lot of their streets don't have speeds over 30 kilometers [approximately 18 miles] an hour. On neighborhood streets, they build in surface treatments that inherently force you to slow down, like laying cobblestone or narrowing the street. Also, because more people bike there, drivers have a more empathetic approach toward cyclists.A separated cycling track. (Modacity)Why do you think we have this mentality that the car is more important than a cyclist or even a person?C: It's been a product of 60 years of post-war planning and propaganda from the automobile industries that streets are for one purpose: moving cars from A to B. Before the Second World War, streets in a lot of Dutch cities were places for connection and community and commerce. Then the post-war planners came along pushed all those public functions into parks and private spaces. The Dutch resisted that urge to modernize their city around the car, so they kind of have this 40 to 50-year head start on us.You see cycling as a way of connecting diverse groups of people —not just hard infrastructure, but an element of what Eric Klinenberg calls the social infrastructure which binds people and communities together. M: On a bike, you inherently have to make a physical connection with people. In a car, you're separated by glass and steel. But when you're out on a bike, you can actually see everybody, you can say hello to the people that you meet along the way. The side of the road becomes a place to reconnect or have a quick wave in the morning to brighten your day. That's how we need to see our streets—as places for connection as opposed to just a place to pass through.There's a great chapter in your book titled "Not Sport. Transport." You make the point that riding a bike can connect more people to public transit. C: The prevailing understanding is that the bicycle doesn't replace the car. Neither does the public transit system. But by combining bikes with trains and buses, and trams, suddenly you've got this game-changing seamless transportation network that can get you from door-to-door often quicker than a car, with a little bit of exercise and social connection. In the Netherlands, that means providing bike parking and infrastructure that leads to the transit stop, and then providing a last-mile solution like bike sharing or rental on the other side of the trip. That ultimately can be used as a strategy to reduce congestion in our cities.Bike parking at a public transit stop. (Modacity)What about electric bikes now that they are growing in use?M: Electric bikes are quite prevalent throughout the Netherlands.C: One in three new bike purchases is electric-assist.M: For e-bikes that can go over 40 kilometers [approximately 25 miles] an hour, those see a lot more restrictions than just the regular e-bike.C: They can't use the bike infrastructure, they have to wear a helmet, and they have to have some kind of insurance and registration.M: E-bikes give people an option to travel longer distances without worrying about the sweat or having to change clothes or even just the extra exertion and time it takes.A really nice bike isn't cheap. A Dutch bike can cost more than $1000; a cargo bike several thousand; and an electric bike can be even more. Does this reflect and reinforce our growing urban economic divide? C: Countries such as Belgium, France, and Germany started incentivizing electric and cargo bikes by providing tax rebates or cash discounts for residents in the knowledge that they will ultimately reduce the amount of capital they have to spend on car infrastructure. Keep in mind that any transportation system that requires somebody to own and maintain a $20-30,000 motor vehicle is the ultimate inequitable solution. Supplementing bike share is another way: In Vancouver, we now have a community pass where you can get an annual membership for $20 if you qualify as a low-income resident. There are solutions out there, they just involve subsidy and incentivizing these purchases.What are some of the Netherlands’ key steps that cities might be able to emulate to make themselves safer for pedestrians and cyclists? C: They've developed the Sustainable Safety principles which categorizes and codifies all of these safety ideas into a manual that their street designers and engineers would always have to follow. In North America, we’ve maybe only now reached a point where people are rightfully shocked by the carnage that takes place every day. One of the biggest challenges we have right now in city building is reducing the amount of death and injury on our streets.You make this great point in the book that there's no “one size fits all.” Every city is different and you can't just copy and paste.M: Too often cities are like, “Let's just put in a bunch of separated cycle tracks and everyone will be safe.” It's more about looking at how those spaces are used and what you want that space to be used for.  That’s why “8-80” is such a great term. If it's not great for 8 year olds and it's not great for 80 year olds to move around a city on however they want to move, whether that's foot, bike, car, or public transportation, then something needs to change.R: Your book focuses on the Netherlands and Europe, but do any North American cities get it close to right?M: Oh, for sure! We've got it pretty good in Vancouver. We talk about New York; it's still slow progress and there's always a battle against parking and less space to work with. We'd like to also point out Calgary, Alberta. In a Canadian context, it’s a pretty unlikely city to be adopting cycling and they did it in a very affordable and quite effective way. So we're all doing it in our own way that makes sense for our city. Also, the Dutch have been doing this for 50 or 60 years, but they made a lot of mistakes along the way. We can now look at that and say that idea didn't work, let's not do that, let's try this better one.What are the constraints that hold cities back from doing this? What are the things that tend to get in the way of implementing a more vigorous agenda for cycling and safety?C: Perhaps the most dangerous idea is that cities are done or they've reached the peak. Once the place is declared America's or Canada's “bicycle capital,” politicians feel like their work is done. The job of building the cycling city is never done.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: South Africa Pushes Science to Improve Daily Life

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Sweeping policy changes aim to refocus research efforts on poverty, unemployment, drought and other national problems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: New NASA Satellite’s Lasers Will Track Tiny Changes in Polar Ice

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NASA's ICESat-2 will watch over the planet's polar ice to improve forecasts of sea level rise.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Dublin’s Housing Crisis Reaches a Boiling Point

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10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

This week, Dublin blew its reputation as one of Europe’s most easygoing capitals.On Wednesday, the city saw impromptu demonstrations that ground several central streets to a halt as angry protesters sat down and chanted. The immediate source of their anger was an ugly fight between private security guards, police, and housing activists who occupied an empty building in the city center. In that fight, police backed up security guards in beating protesters, to the point that several needed hospital treatment.When it comes to the wider sources of protesters’ discontent, however, that incident is just the tip of the iceberg. Desperation at an ongoing housing crisis is revealing that, as Irish Times columnist Una Mullally puts it “under the surface of glossy Dublin, the city is actually failing, fast.”We’re sitting down and taking back the city! Join the protest #TakeBacktheCity pic.twitter.com/tKmUfAFEYf — Take Back The City - Dublin (@TBTCDublin) September 12, 2018This week’s protest emerged after activist group Take Back the City occupied an apparently long-vacant Georgian building at 34 North Frederick Street. Having occupied several other central buildings, Take Back the City’s intention was to protest the housing crisis by shining the spotlight on buildings that have sat empty for a long while, as well as on those being converted for use by the tourist industry. The situation only intensified when the occupied building’s landlord sent in masked security guards to clear it, and when the police backed them up with batons. It has confirmed many people’s hunch that, as it has proved all but inactive over vacancies, the state is on the landlords’ side.Exactly how things reached this point—and what protesters want—takes some explaining, although the backdrop to this month’s clashes will sound grimly familiar to many city-dwellers worldwide.Dublin has a desperate shortage of affordable housing, one that risks pushing it toward dysfunction. The city’s average rent as of March was up to €1,875 ($2,176) a month. This is a large amount for anyone on the Irish average monthly wage of €3,181 ($3,692) and completely impossible for anyone paid anything close to the minimum hourly wage of €9.25 ($10.74).Public housing for low-income residents exists, though much of it has been depleted, as in the U.K., by state sell-offs to the private market. What remains is far too small a quantity to satisfy demand, while new construction has dwindled. People still struggle to find a way because Dublin so totally dominates the Irish economy; young people are being scattered to other cities, and Dublin’s poorest are increasingly finding themselves on the streets.All of this has happened fast. At the beginning 2016 there were just 400 families registered as homeless in Ireland—a small but not negligible number in a country of under 5 million. By the end of 2016, that number had more than doubled, to 1,000. That number continues to creep up, and currently represents around 10,000 individuals (not families). Dublin is the most pressured spot in the country, with 76 children made homeless within the city’s limits in the month of May alone.The strains of housing costs are a constant topic of discussion among Dublin residents. In an example of this, a Facebook post by singer-songwriter David Kitt went viral this summer, announcing that he too would be leaving Dublin. “Dublin’s heart and soul is being ripped out and sold to the highest bidder,” he wrote:The house I live in just got sold as part of a portfolio to a consortium of European investors. It will be sold or rented no doubt to someone working for Amazon on a base salary of 70k, while the people who make this city what it is are forced out to the suburbs, or to a city they can afford a reasonable quality of life, and where their level of income doesn’t make them feel like a complete failure.The obvious answer to this impasse would be to build more homes—lots of them. Ireland in fact has many empty homes. They’re just mostly in the wrong places, thanks to a housing bubble that saw development across the country in the run-up to the financial crisis. Land around Dublin, meanwhile, is scarce and expensive. When it does get built, it does little to alleviate the situation for people on lower or middle incomes. As if prompted by the protests, the government has just released a plan that it says could deliver 150,000 homes in Dublin and Cork, Ireland’s second city, over the next 20 years—a promising proposal whose implementation and efficacy still need to be clarified.There’s another predictable factor in Dublin’s housing crisis, however. Increasingly, landlords and developers aren’t interested in local residents at all. They’re after tourists.  Much new inner-Dublin development is geared toward short-term visitors, with apartment hotels cropping up across the city center in places where actual long-term apartments are needed. The government and city council are widely resented for abetting this process—through lax planning, inaction over owners who leave their sites vacant or derelict, refusal to consider schemes to reduce rent rises, and a glacial approach to increasing public housing stock.Seeing the Gardaí, as the Irish police are known, assisting balaclava-wearing bailiffs with their batons only reinforces this feeling. And while the current scuffle may soon fade from public attention, the struggle over Dublin housing may well accelerate.Next on Take Back the City’s list is another key site, a building in central Dublin that housed Ireland’s last Magdalene Laundry, places where unmarried mothers were confined against their will and forced to work in brutal, exploitative conditions. You might expect a publicly owned site like this to house a memorial to the laundries’ victims, or at least some public or affordable housing that embodies a more benign vision of the state’s power. Instead the site is due to be turned into another hotel. In a city where many people are sick of such decisions, don’t expect the plan to go through uncontested.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: An Equator Full of Hurricanes Shows a Preview of End Times

10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

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10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

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10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

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10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

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10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4967
10 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4693

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

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