Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The New Stars of a NYC Subway Station: Very Good Doggos

Artist William Wegman began photographing his pet Weimaraner dogs in the 1970s. Since then, his portraits of them have become famous, brightening up Sesame Street, museums, and fashion magazines. Now, they will help New York subway riders feel a little better about their commute.

Flo and Topper—who are the 78-year-old artist’s ninth and tenth Weimaraners —grace the walls of the redesigned 23rd Street (M and F lines) station in multiple poses and outfits as part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s Enhanced Station Initiative. The dog portraits, turned into mosaics by Mayer of Munich, provide a pleasant distraction for rush-hour commuters navigating the congested march in and out of the nearly 80-year-old station.

The mosaics present instantly familiar work in a new light, leaving Wegman impressed with “how exceptional the shirts and coats look in stone and glass translation.” (Patrick J. Cashin/MTA)

Wegman’s dogs have been called upon to help weary travelers before: In 2005, two of them were dressed as astronauts for permanent portraits high up on the vaulted concrete ceilings inside L’Enfant Plaza Metro station in Southwest D.C. And inside a Maine Turnpike rest stop in Kennebunkport, a 2007 mural depicts four of the silver-colored dogs with their heads tilted up. “But no one ever looks up at it,” the artist told CityLab.

When deciding what to create for the MTA, Wegman knew it would be a challenge to get straphangers’ attention. “When I go to these stations, I do look at the mosaics,” he said, “but maybe that’s because I’m an artist … typically, people are thinking more about where they’re going.”

Wegman’s addition to the New York subway is a delight for its users and a testament to MTA Art and Design’s ability to create moments of joy in a transit system otherwise known for its headaches. (Patrick J. Cashin/MTA)

Even though Flo and Topper had previously posed for French Vogue, Wegman decided to keep things simple on 23rd Street, presenting them as relatable, conventionally dressed figures seemingly looking for the next train. Despite that, the dogs will certainly attract notice inside a station that had been devoid of anything worth absorbing up until its late November reopening. “The public already knows Bill’s work, so it’s like seeing old friends,” said Sandra Bloodsworth, director of MTA Arts & Design (the commission has selected artists for station works since its formation in 1985). The mosaics present instantly familiar work in a new light, leaving Wegman impressed with “how exceptional the shirts and coats look in stone and glass translation.”

“You can almost feel the moisture on the dogs,” added Bloodsworth.

Wegman’s addition to the New York subway is a delight for its users and a testament to MTA Art and Design’s ability to create moments of joy in a transit system otherwise known for its headaches. Like many other recently upgraded MTA stations, 23rd and 6th still lacks elevator access. New art, information screens, tiles, benches, and lighting are great, but nearly 30 years since the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, this prewar station is no easier to access.