Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise for Common Cause of Blindness

Results from two early clinical trials show that it may be possible to use human embryonic stem cells as treatment for the dry form of macular degeneration, according to presentations given today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Research to Prevent Blindness and American Academy of Ophthalmology Announce New Grant Opportunities to Support Vision Research

Research to Prevent Blindness and the American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced that they have created a new category of grant to support researchers who want to use the Academy’s IRIS(r) Registry database to conduct population-based studies in ophthalmology and blindness prevention.

Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: World’s Largest Clinical Specialty Database Yields Critical Insights to Advance Ophthalmic Patient Care

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced key milestones and clinical insights from studies powered by its clinical database. The IRIS(r) Registry (Intelligent Research In Sight) has amassed more than 41.2 million unique patients in its database, representing 166.2 million patient visits, covering 11 percent of the U.S. population.

Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Genetic Treatment for Blindness May Soon be Reality

Patients who had lost their sight to an inherited retinal disease could see well enough to navigate a maze after being treated with a new gene therapy, according to research presented today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Genetic Testing Recommended for Children Considered at Risk for Most Common Eye Cancer

Children who are considered to be at risk of developing eye cancer should receive genetic counseling and testing as soon as possible to clarify risk for the disease. This is the consensus of leading ophthalmologists, pathologists and geneticists, who worked to develop the first U.S. guidelines on how to screen for the most common eye tumor affecting children.