Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: What Will It Take to Make Buildings Carbon Neutral?

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

If cities are going to curb the rise of global temperatures to less than 2 degrees Celsius, they’ll have to address the single largest contributor, by sector, to their carbon footprint: buildings. Buildings account for roughly 50 percent of a city’s total carbon emissions, and 70 percent in major cities like London, Los Angeles, and Paris.The ultimate goal, as laid out by the World Green Building Council at COP 21 in Paris in 2015, is that by 2050—when 68 percent of the world’s population is projected to live in urban areas—all buildings will only use as much energy as they generate. And to get there, a group of large cities is first tackling a closer target. Last month, the mayors of 19 cities—including New York, London, Tokyo, and Johannesburg—declared that they will enact policies and regulations that will make all new buildings carbon neutral by 2030.The bad news is that the larger challenge is to make existing, not new, buildings more efficient. Buildings that already exist today are estimated to account for 65 percent of all buildings in Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries come 2060.Even so, changing how new buildings are built has major implications for the future. And fortunately, raising standards for new buildings—compared to retrofitting older ones—is the lower-hanging fruit. “New construction is potentially much easier, since you’re starting from scratch,” said Ralph DiNola, CEO of the New Buildings Institute, a nonprofit that advocates for better energy performance in buildings. Not that there won’t be any challenges, DiNola added, but carbon neutrality “is a good and realistic goal as long as we are clear about what that requires for the buildings.”For starters, cities need to have in place a climate action plan; robust building codes that keep up with energy-efficient technology and design; and energy-intensity targets that will guide buildings toward zero carbon emissions, said DiNola. The New Buildings Institute works with New York and other cities to develop “stretch codes”—an extra layer of local, more stringent regulations on top of the base building codes, which focus specifically on energy efficiency. Cities also need to set up a system of rewards and penalties, and give builders and developers enough time to comply.To reach net-zero carbon, DiNola said, the energy usage of buildings will have to be cut anywhere from 50 to 85 percent—and that means addressing the main energy hogs. “Heating, cooling, hot water, and lighting are the primary loads in most buildings,” according to Maureen Guttman, an architect and green-building expert at the Alliance to Save Energy. On average, those loads account for 75 percent of the energy consumed in the U.S. building sector, and 40 to 50 percent of total energy demand (not just in buildings) in the world.As I reported last year when New York City announced a mandate to make all its existing buildings greener, features like higher-efficiency heating and lighting systems help. It isn’t a matter of finding new technology, Guttman said—rather, it boils down to designing a good building envelope to avoid heat gain over the warmer seasons and heat loss during the cold. That means good insulation in everything from the walls to the floor to the ceiling and eliminating air leakage (which, by one estimate, can account for at least 25 percent of heating load), as well as an effective ventilation system. It also means windows that reduce heat intake, or “cool” roofs that reflect sunlight instead of absorbing its heat.Asked whether the 19 cities will reach the 2030 goal, Guttman said there’s no question they can. “Zero [carbon] buildings are being built without sophisticated materials or sophisticated equipment,” she added. “We have the technology.”A rooftop covered with solar panels at the Brooklyn Navy Yard in New York. For cities to go carbon neutral, off-site renewable energy as well as urban solar panels and wind turbines will be key. (Mark Lennihan/AP)One example is Melbourne’s Pixel Building (the first carbon-neutral building in Australia), which opened in 2011. Colorful panels control the amount of light coming into the building, and “smart” windows allow heat to escape on summer nights while filtering in fresh air. Solar panels and wind turbines sit on the rooftop, generating renewable power. Canada’s first carbon-neutral building is now under construction—set to open later this year in Waterloo—and will include solar walls as well as a three-story green wall to offset carbon emissions. Both buildings incorporate many of the basic elements that Guttman describes.Solar and wind energy are promising alternatives to fossil fuels, but generating a lot of them requires ample land space that cities don’t have. (Solar panels atop tall, skinny buildings can only go so far.) The group of 19 cities that signed the carbon-neutral pledge includes some of world’s largest and most populated cities. “That means that they have dense urban infrastructure,” said DiNola. “So they would have to have a way for owners to use renewable energy that is generated off-site, rather than requiring on-site renewable energy generation.”So where can cities get their renewable energy? Utility-scale solar could remake the world’s energy supply by 2050. If that’s not fast enough, a 2016 report from Energy Cities, a coalition of local authorities focused on energy transition in the European Union, recommended that officials create partnerships between city centers and their surrounding rural communities. The authors call it a win-win: Urban centers need energy and may be willing to provide financial or technical support to rural communities, and those communities have land for, say, wind farms and solar arrays, but not necessarily the funding and research to develop them.In Washington, D.C., for example, three universities inside the city—Georgetown, George Washington, and American—have collaborated on a project to supply half of their combined energy needs from a solar farm in North Carolina. This kind of partnership, when scaled up, could address the density challenge that DiNola describes and curb the carbon footprint of not just a few buildings but potentially an entire city.Instead of technology, what cities need is training—so designers and builders know how to erect green buildings, so tenants and operators can ensure that buildings actually function at high efficiency, and so codes are enforced, and the city’s agenda is carried out. But perhaps most of all, Guttman noted, they need political will. Cities that want greener buildings will likely face a political backlash—especially in the U.S., where regulation has always been a subject of contentious debate.If cities are serious, “everybody needs to do things differently than the way we do them now,” Guttman said. That would mean more stringent credentials and qualifications for design and construction professionals, as well as code enforcers. It could also mean changing the way we aim for the Paris target of making buildings energy-neutral by 2050.Guttman thinks energy goals should be set on a community basis, rather than per building. “I don’t think any hospital is ever going to achieve net zero, or any laboratory. Or any restaurant, possibly,” she said, because their use of specialized equipment pushes up their energy use so much. “These are just high energy-intensive buildings that need to rely on the super efficiency of [their] neighbor.”So, given that some buildings consume a lot of energy to perform specific, important tasks, cities could incentivize the owners of other buildings to go beyond net zero and generate more energy than they need. “It’s really got to be a concerted effort by a lot of people,” Guttman said.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The App That Pays You to Find a Smarter Commute

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Humans are creatures of habit, and that’s certainly true when it comes to commuting. But University of Maryland researchers behind a new app are betting that with the right incentives, commuters might switch to “smarter” routes—ones that are better for the environment, for the user, and for all the other people trying to move around.The app, called Incentrip, is part of a $4.5 million research project funded by the Department of Energy to predict traffic and ease congestion. Currently being piloted in Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, it essentially turns the commuting experience into a game. When users put their destination into the app, they’re shown a handful of options—car, bus, subway, biking, and ride-sharing—with information about the length, time, and amount of fuel consumed for each mode.The app awards points based on how a user chooses to get around, giving more points for greener and more efficient methods. For drivers who aren’t ready to pivot to public transit just yet, the app awards a few points for choosing a more “eco-friendly” driving route.For my own commute—from Silver Spring, Maryland, to CityLab’s office in D.C.’s Foggy Bottom neighborhood—I have a few options. I can do a 28-minute drive, using half a gallon of gasoline, for three points. An hour-long metro ride, meanwhile, uses just a tenth of a gallon and is worth 87 points. If I wanted to bike the entire eight miles, I’d get a hefty 117 points.Those points, calculated through AI based on the user’s behavioral patterns, can then go toward prizes like gift cards to Amazon, Apple, and Google. A $50 gift card to Google or Apple costs 5,000 points.My options going from the Georgetown neighborhood in Washington, D.C., to Chinatown. (Screenshot/Incentrip)“The goal is to minimize energy use across the entire transit system,” said lead researcher Lei Zhang, who heads the university’s National Transportation Center. That’s why biking and walking will generally get you more points. Incentrip’s incentives are dynamic, he added, “calculated for every trip based on real-time information and on our prediction of future traffic conditions, and they’re based on what we have learned about the users.”The app has about 35,000 trial users on both Android and iOS, and Zhang says his team is working on non-monetary incentives as well, including a way to show how one user’s decisions can help other travelers. (The research group gets the bulk of its traffic and transit data through its partnership with D.C.’s and Maryland’s transportation departments.)Curiously, to earn the maximum 126 points on my commute, I would would have to take the metro into D.C., walk to Arlington, Virginia, then circle back to my office via a car. That’s obviously not efficient or sensible. When I asked Zhang about it, he assured me that AI would adjust what I see. “If we suggest transit options that we never see you take, then we realize [you won’t] take them even with incentives,” he said. “So on the underlying behavior model, which is based on AI, we’re learning what options might work better for you. Over time it may encourage you to do Uber pool or ride-sharing, or a different departure time.”Turning a commute into a point-based game can bring a new dynamic to getting around town, and can also make people consider their choices more actively. In 2012, for example, the Singapore government doled out incentives to commuters who travel during off-peak hours. Those who did so were entered into raffles to win as much as $100, and were offered points and other perks for inviting friends to do the same. The six-month pilot program shifted nearly 7.5 percent of all peak commutes to off-peak hours.That success certainly makes a case for gamifying transit, but long-term change is more complicated than enticing people to try out a new commute. Kari Watkins, who studies the use of technology in transportation and in commuter decision making at Georgia Tech, says the way people value their time will always be a prime factor.“If it takes you twice as long on transit than when you’re driving yourself somewhere, then that adds up to a lot of money if you value your time at, say, $20 an hour,” she says. “Nothing about gamification is going to change that part of the equation.”While that may prevent dramatic changes on a large scale, she says it can still make a meaningful difference on the margins. Some people will face similar commute times through different options, or will be motivated by saving a few dollars or cutting down on stress from traffic. Apps like Incentrip can be more successful, she adds, if they make choosing transit a seamless decision by providing more real-time information.At some point, Zhang’s app will learn if its users become habitual riders who regularly take the bus or metro. In that case, “we may reduce the amount of incentives for you to use transit because maybe it’s better to use these incentives to encourage the people who drive,” he says.Steven Higashide, director of research at the non-profit Transit Center, said he’s seen different versions of these incentive-based initiatives before—transit agencies have been testing them for decades. Yet he notes that even if new habits are formed, in the long run, people won’t stick with transit if the service isn’t reliable. And as CityLab recently reported, many U.S. cities don’t exactly have a good track record of providing quality service.At the end of the day, “eco-points will not get people to continue to ride a rail system that routinely breaks down,” Higashide says.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Cooling Dallas’s Concrete Jungle

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Finding shade isn’t always easy in Dallas, Texas. Though home to one of the nation’s largest urban forests—the 6,000-acre Great Trinity Forest—there’s a dearth of trees in the rest of the city. At the same time, the urban heat island effect has made Dallas one of the fastest-warming cities in the United States.“If we continue to add impervious surfaces and remove trees, we could have an urban heat island that covers almost half the city,” said Matt Grubisich, director of operations and urban forestry at the local Texas Trees Foundation.That’s why earlier this year, volunteers spread out across the barren sidewalks of Oak Cliff, one of the city’s most vulnerable neighborhoods. With shovels and pick axes in hand, they began digging. The goal is to eventually plant 1,000 trees; so far, some 500 saplings are in the ground as part of a project called Cool and Connected Oak Cliff. Planting trees is a common low-tech solution to battle the heat island, but high temperatures are just one target of this ambitious project. Using sophisticated data and GIS technology, it also aims to harness the many other benefits of trees, from improving public health to taming traffic on the streets.To understand how the unequal distribution of green infrastructure affects low-income communities, researchers overlaid a map of Dallas's parks with socioeconomic and demographic data from the census. Areas in red are considered high priority. (The Trust for Public Land)In 2015, the Texas Trees Foundation laid the groundwork for the project by mapping the tree cover throughout Dallas. They used aerial imagery to capture the overall canopy, and then physically counted the species of trees in a sample of more than 600 plots. On average, they found, Dallas has 29 percent canopy coverage. Some pockets of neighborhoods have less than 10 percent.A sliver of good news came in the foundation’s 2017 report on urban heat management in the city, which suggested that trees could help curb temperatures by as much as 15 degrees on hot days. Grubisich and his team had collected and analyzed the city’s impervious surfaces, and looked at air temperature readings to identify areas that experience higher than expected temperatures.For Robert Kent at the Trust for Public Lands—which partnered with both the Texas Trees Foundation and the Nature Conservancy on the project—that was plenty of data to work with. He fed them into a visual mapping program, overlaying the numbers with additional data on the socioeconomic and health status of Dallas’s neighborhoods.Oak Cliff is shaded in an alarming red when researchers mapped out where communities are most at risk for heat-related health problems like asthma, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. (The Trust for Public Land)“We go beyond just looking at single issues, and actually seeing where are the intersections between challenges posed by climate change within a city,” said Kent, who heads the group’s north Texas division. “So our maps also looked at where are the neighborhoods that suffer from the highest health disparities—we know that urban heat is going to exacerbate cardiovascular conditions and asthma, so let’s find the places that have high prevalences of those diseases.”When they put together that map, which also included data on the prevalence of diabetes—extreme temperatures deter an active lifestyle—the lower half of Oak Cliff was shaded in an alarming red, indicating high priority for greening intervention.Trees, though, can do more than mitigate the heat island effect. Kent’s team also put together a map that combines a variety of data: heat, health, equity, flood zones, and pedestrian and biking safety. The groups settled on targeting areas that show high health disparities—particularly among the elderly—as well as public schools that have little to no shade near playgrounds, and places with high foot traffic and pedestrian deaths.After all, trees provide a good buffer between pedestrians on the sidewalk and vehicles on the road. “It not only provides a physical barrier of separation, but the tree will also be a signal to drivers to slow down,” Kent said. “It also makes the sidewalk a more inviting place to walk.”Researchers combined data about equity, health, pedestrian safety, urban heat, and flood risks to map out which parts of the neighborhood needs trees and other green infrastructure the most. (The Trust for Public Land)While data brought the project to the southern part of Oak Cliff, numbers can only reveal so much about the needs of a community without local input. The project needed the trust of locals in this area of nearly 300,000 people, where almost a third of families live below the poverty line, according to 2016 census data. Across the city, some of the poorest ZIP codes are in areas that are made up of predominantly minority populations.Historically, the black community here has been neglected, said Holy Cross Catholic Church’s Kebran Alexander, who’s lived in Oak Cliff since the 1980s. “There has been decisions by developers that left Oak Cliff particularly vulnerable over decades to neglect and blight.” Indeed, a recent study out of University of North Texas identified the southern half of the city, where Oak Cliff sits, as the most troubling areas of decline. When Alexander and other volunteers from his church came out to help plant the trees, they came across trash, broken bottles, and leftover concrete from prior constructions.All that has left seniors, who can’t afford to move to other neighborhoods, vulnerable to the heat island effect. Many of their yards are browning and either lack a tree or have an aging one in need of removal. “So you cut a tree down because you were afraid it was going to fall on your house,” Alexander said, “but then, what happens to your cooling bill? And your grass? [These are] things that add to the quality of your health.”Also vulnerable are students, whose public schools have little shade to provide relief during recess. Alexander called the playgrounds “literal hotboxes.”Community leaders like Alexander vetted the good intentions of the project’s plan—to make sure they actually help those who need it most and, in essence, to close the trust gap between residents and the organizers. In one instance, for example, the GIS data pinpointed a residential street running parallel to the busy Illinois Avenue as an area to plant trees, but the thing was, few people walk down that stretch of road. ”The kids actually walk down the busy thoroughfare because they are going to the corner store to get drinks or candy,” said Alexander. “It was those types of granular adjustments from the ground level that we were able to give them some insights.”Roots of a larger goalWhen it comes to tackling climate change, and the human consequences of it, planting 1,000 trees seems almost insignificant—even for Dallas. The Texas Trees Foundation’s report suggests that the city will need to increase its tree canopy by about 5 percent to make a dent in curbing the heat island effect. That can mean roughly 300,000 trees. But Grubisich said it’s a good start to push revitalization efforts in at-risk neighborhoods in a city that’s historically favored new developments, and it could eventually generate more data to drive policy change.The hope is to take their experience in Oak Cliff and repeat it in other neighborhoods across Dallas. The three groups will monitor the neighborhood’s temperatures and health statistics over the next five years, with the Trust for Public Land updating the GIS maps annually. They’ll also maintain the trees over the next two years, during which they’ll come up with a plan to transition the task over to the community and the local government.For Laura Huffman, the Nature Conservancy’s state director in Texas, the project is about much more than increasing tree canopy. “Part of what we’re doing in this work is generating the science to connect the dots between trees and vegetation and mental health and well-being, and things like asthma,” she said.Meanwhile, Alexander is under no illusion that this will solve Oak Cliff’s inequality. But, he said, “I have to remain optimistic because we have to start somewhere.” At the very least, the project has piqued the curiosity of the residents. Dozens have already volunteered to help. Others, meanwhile peeked through their blinds to see what was going on, Alexander recalled of the day he volunteered. Some even stepped outside, asking for a tree in their yard.For many, Alexander said, this was one of the first times they’d seen anybody invested in their neighborhood. And while they might not see immediate benefits—it takes time for trees to mature—they can at least  “see the potential.”

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: This Map Takes All the Guesswork out of Confusing Street Parking Rules

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Parking in San Francisco is a nightmare. Not only is parking scarce, but the rules that govern the city’s curbs can be baffling, changing by hour and by the day. One study estimated that the average driver there spends as much as 83 hours a year circling the streets to find an open spot, further worsening the city’s already hectic congestion problem.Fortunately, San Francisco drivers can find some relief in a new Curb Explorer tool from Coord, a company backed by Sidewalk Labs that is on a mission to make urban streets easier to navigate. The latest project is to “code the curb,” as Coord CEO Stephen Smyth described it in a post on Medium.Coord sent its team out to the the commercial corridors of San Francisco, where they photographed parking signs, hydrants, bus stops, and other features that dictate how a curb can be used. They used an app that analyzes those photos for parking information, and then translated that data into rules that can be mapped for easy viewing. On the color-coded map, red curbs indicate no-parking areas, for example; dark blue zones are paid parking, and light blue zones are free.Parking rules are color-coded on the interactive map. (Coord/Medium)Users can filter the data based on date, time, vehicle type, and what they’re ultimately looking for, whether that’s a free parking spot for two hours or a paid space for eight hours. Truck drivers can find loading zones, indicated in yellow. And—particularly fitting for the city that brought ridesharing into the mainstream—Uber, Lyft, and taxi drivers can see all the dedicated pick-up/drop-off zones that San Francisco introduced last November to address the problem of ride-hail drivers blocking transit and bike lanes. (A study by the city’s police department found more than three-quarters of the 239 lane-obstruction tickets issued between April and June 2017 went to ride-hail drivers.)San Francisco may have it particularly bad, but hellish parking isn’t unique to any one city. Nationally, the average driver spends as much as 17 hours a year looking for parking, resulting in $345 in time, fuel, and emissions, according to one study. So Coord hopes to partner with municipalities and companies to essentially digitize the curb and turn that data into something useful. As of now, the San Francisco map lives on a website that’s accessible on mobile, but likely not useful to someone who is already behind the wheel.Down the line, however, Coord’s tool may be incorporated into other driving and navigation apps. “We hope this will help jumpstart the conversation on the importance of the curb in the rapidly evolving transportation landscape,” Smyth wrote.Orange marks the zones designated for passenger pick-up and drop-off, which the city introduced last year to ease congestion related to Uber and Lyft. (Screenshot/Coord)Indeed, the humble curb is becoming one of a city’s most valuable assets. As planners begin thinking beyond private car ownership, and as space becomes more scarce, a number of interests are jockeying for the strip of road between moving traffic and the sidewalk. Mass transit advocates will argue for more bus lanes and de-prioritizing parking. Meanwhile the likes of Uber and Waymo are betting on autonomous vehicles and may push for special “docking” zones. Still others will advocate bike lanes and pedestrian zones as solutions to easing congestion in the city.What they are ultimately fighting for is a say in how governments manage and regulate curbside access, and they’re not the only ones. As my colleague Laura Bliss wrote, “Rethinking the curb is going to take a lot of buy-in from not only city leaders but also from retailers, who are often unhappy about losing storefront parking spots.”Nonetheless, cities are starting take curb management seriously. Consider Seattle, which in 2016 redefined curbs as flex zones in which curb use—whether for passenger pick-up, bike-share stations, or commercial loading—is prioritized differently depending on the type of street (mixed use versus residential versus industrial areas). Not surprisingly, the city generally ranked transit higher than metered parking. The move resulted in at least one major payoff, as CityLab has reported: a boost in bus ridership at a time when, nationally, fewer people are taking mass transit.Other cities, according to a white paper by the National Association of City Transportation Officials, have looked into prioritizing curbside use for transit during “peak periods”—when bus volumes are at their highest—and allocating curb space in main streets for short-term uses, like passenger drop-off, and zones further down the road in less congested areas for longer-term activities.For some cities, though, the process starts not with changing the policies but simply getting a better grasp of their curbside assets. That’s what Washington, D.C., did in 2015 to ease truck-related traffic congestion, which was estimated to cost the city $650 million each year. The district digitally mapped all 500 of its curbside loading zones and collected data on their use. That helped officials determine where to increase loading zones and to implement a demand-based pricing system, charging truck drivers higher prices during peak hours. The goal was to encourage them to deliver goods overnight, and ease congestion during the day. It also made the job easier on the drivers, who can now use the district’s website to look for loading zones in advance.So, as urban planners like those at NACTO will tell you, when planners seriously rethink curb management, and with transit in mind, the cities themselves are ultimately the winner. And by mapping those changes and initiatives, as Coord has done for San Francisco, cities can help their drivers navigate around any confusion.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Why Are Cities So Vulnerable to Cyber Attack?

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

For more than a week, one of America’s largest cities has been caught in a “hostage situation.” That’s how Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms described the crippling cyberattack from an infamous hacker group known as SamSam, which started last Thursday and has essentially forced an aspiring smart city to revert to pen and paper.The cyberattack involved, among other things, hackers encrypting city files, locking access to online services, and blocking the city from processing court cases and warrants. ...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Take a Virtual Tour of Japan With 3 Very Good Boys

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

First, the sheep of the Faroe Islands took the world on a virtual gallop of their picturesque archipelago. Then felines gave us a cat’s eye view of the Japanese city of Onomichi. But perhaps no creature is more constitutionally fit for the job of tour-group leader than the domestic dog: Man’s (actual) best friend possesses a curious nature, impeccable wayfinding skills, and an innate determination to never leave you behind.Which brings us to Asuka, Ako, and Puuko. The three furry Akitas have bee...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Building Better Bus Stops Can Be A Snap

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Bus transit is often treated as an afterthought in American cities. Building out the infrastructure needed to make it reliable—like dedicated bus lanes or better boarding platforms—can require costly and disruptive roadwork. That can make local governments hesitant to take on such projects, even though evidence shows that improving bus networks is key to increasing ridership. (Just look at Seattle.)But it doesn’t have to be that way. Some cities are now showing the rest of the U.S. that building...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Pick Up Trash While You Exercise. It’s Called Plogging.

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Take a run in any city and you’re bound to find litter strewn along sidewalks, roadways, and trails. The average jogger may blow right past it. A plogger like Laura Lindberg, though, will make picking it up a crucial part of her daily workout routine.“On any of my runs during the week, I’m out there with a pair of gloves and a plastic bag picking up garbage and recycling,” Lindberg said. The 36-year-old from Hoboken, New Jersey, is one of the latest runners across the globe to join the plogging ...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: China’s Subway Boom Slows Down

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

China’s first ever subway runs through the heart of Beijing. Proposed in 1953 as a way to ferry soldiers from their barracks on the outskirts to the city center, the 13-mile, 16-station metro line opened in 1969 after years of debate, including one over the decision to ultimately knock down the 700-year-old Dadu City Wall that once protected the emperor of the Yuan Dynasty.Beijing’s Line 1 didn’t opened to the public until the 1980s. And in the years that followed its initial run, subway expansi...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Mapping the ‘Conflict Zones’ Between Sprawl and Biodiversity

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

By 2030, the world is expected to add another billion people or so, bringing the total population to roughly 8.5 billion. And with humans becoming increasingly urban, sprawl will only get worse, taking up precious space that wild birds, mammals, plants, and the like can still call home.In fact, at least 423 large cities (that is, with more than 300,000 people) across the globe are nestled inside 36 biodiversity hotspots: regions that harbor a high diversity of animal and plant species found virt...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: In Cities, Coyotes and Foxes Are Learning to Get Along

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Under a dimly lit streetlight in Madison, Wisconsin, a woman witnessed a standoff between a fox and a coyote—two predators that have made the city their home. In an email to wildlife researcher David Drake at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, she described the brief (and quite frankly, anti-climatic) interaction: For about 15 seconds, they stood face-to-face, about 10 feet part. They then turned around—and sauntered off in the opposite direction.Since asking the public to help track Madison’...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: More Lights, More Diseases?

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Light pollution is known to cause all kinds of problems. Studies show how it can throw sleep cycles out of whack and disrupt the natural ecosystem. Now biology researchers at the University of South Florida suggest yet another unintended consequence of artificial lights: They may help the spread of vector-borne diseases like the West Nile virus.The West Nile virus is carried primarily by birds, and, in the right circumstances, can be passed on to humans via mosquitoes. Typically that infectious ...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Seoul’s Answer to a Pollution Crisis: Free Public Transit

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

When it comes to air pollution, China gets most of the attention as one of Asia’s worst offenders (and rightly so). But South Korea has a massive pollution problem all its own, earning the unenviable title of worst air quality among OECD nations—and experts predict the problem will only get worse over the next five years. So when a thick layer of yellow dust settled over the city last week, local leaders took a drastic step to confront it: declaring an air quality emergency and, for the first ti...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Could You Live Entirely on Mobile Internet? Try It for a Day

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

You can do a lot on your smartphone these days: Surf the web, connect with friends, perhaps even run a business. But could you run your entire life with your smartphone as your only portal to the Internet?If at first that doesn’t sound like a challenge, consider 17-year-old Lilah Gagne. She’ll be the first to tell you just how much of a struggle it can be.Gagne lives Meigs County in rural southeast Ohio, where access to high-speed internet is either unavailable or unaffordable for many families....

Database Proof Substratum: Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Cities Are One Big Evolutionary Experiment

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Historically, the most convincing case for evolution came from the the parts of the natural world left largely untouched by humans. It was, after all, on the isolated Galapagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador that finches—and their many different beaks—helped shape Charles Darwin’s famous theory back in the 1800s.Even at the time, though, evidence for evolution could be found inside bustling and rapidly growing cities. Look no further than the peppered moths. Their white-and-black-speckled wing...

Database Proof Substratum: Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Will Higher Fees Hurt the National Park Service’s Diversity Efforts?

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A trip to some of the U.S.’s top national parks doesn’t come cheap. Once you factor in travel costs, food, lodging, and gear, the dollar amount can easily reach into the hundreds. So when the National Park Service on Tuesday proposed raising the entrance fee per vehicle to $70—more than double the current rate—critics responded that the agency risks pricing even more people, particularly low-income families, out of what is supposed to be public land. In doing so, NPS may be running counter to it...

Database Proof Substratum: Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: How Police Are Preparing for the Arrival of Autonomous Cars

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

On a sunny June afternoon in Chandler, Arizona, more than a dozen police and emergency vehicles paced up and down a mostly empty street, with their sirens blaring and emergency lights flashing. All eyes, though, were on the handful of self-driving cars that shared the road. Some drove in front of a fire truck; others cruised alongside police motorcycles and unmarked cars. Spectators, including Police Lieutenant David Ramer, watched in anticipation as the cars decided when to pull over and when t...

Database Proof Substratum: Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Cities Want Super-Fast Wireless Internet, But on Their Terms

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

In the race to make the U.S. a nation of smart cities, there’s no shortage of big ideas. Cities want to attach sensors to everything—streetlights, bridges, garbage trucks—and use the data they collect to predict things like potholes and traffic. They want their buildings to talk to residents via phones and wearables. They want the city grid to talk to cars. The list goes on.But beneath all those ambitions lies a bigger challenge, one that’s at the heart of legal battles brewing between cities, s...

Database Proof Substratum: Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Road-Tripping in a ‘Hands-Free’ Cadillac

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Letting go is hard.But here I am, going 65 miles an hour on the busy Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C., in an $84,000 Cadillac. The automaker’s rep assures me that it is, in fact, safe to take my hands off the steering wheel, and my foot off the pedal. The car, a 2018 CT6 sedan, is equipped with the company’s semi-autonomous Super Cruise system; it’ll safely take over—as soon as I muster up the fortitude to relinquish control.I press the button telling the car to turn on its self-driving m...

Database Proof Substratum: Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: How Human Activity Is Changing Animal Migration Patterns

1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4966
1 hour ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4692

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Zozu, like any other white stork in Europe, typically flies to southern Africa for the winter. Yet when researchers at Germany’s Max Plank Institute for Ornithology tracked the bird’s path using a GPS logger in 2016, they found that he and a few others had skipped the grueling migration across the Sahara Desert. That year, the birds stopped, instead, in cities like Madrid, Spain, and Rabat, Morocco. Apparently, they had developed a taste for junk food, in particular the stuff that piles up in la...