Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Nuclear Power Plants Brace for Hurricane Florence

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Two nuclear plants in Hurricane Florence’s path are vulnerable to hurricane-force winds and flooding, according to the watchdog group the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). As Florence approaches the North Carolina coast Thursday, the Brunswick plant near Wilmington, North Carolina, and the Surry plant near Williamsburg, Virginia, might be unprepared for the up-to-13-foot storm surges and heavy flooding expected.Dave Lochbaum, the nuclear safety project director at UCS, said that it’s hard to tell just how vulnerable these plants are because the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has not publicly released the required flood-protection preparedness reports it required following the Fukushima disaster of 2011. That’s when an earthquake-induced tsunami caused three reactor-core meltdowns and a hydrogen explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear-power plant in Japan, forcing thousands of people to evacuate.“We do know that both Brunswick and Surry have had potentially serious problems that we hope they fixed,” Lochbaum said in a UCS press release.UCS points to the fact that in 2012, Duke Energy, Brunswick’s owner, reported to the NRC that there were hundreds of missing or degraded flood barriers at the plant. The company’s follow-up report from 2015 is not publicly available, so there isn’t a way to confirm that the barriers are ready for Florence. In addition, a 2017 NRC summary assessing that follow-up report stated that some plant buildings were designed for a 3.6-foot storm surge—lower than the projections for Florence. As for Surry, a 2015 document from plant owner Dominion stated that heavy rainfall could cause flooding that overwhelms the plant’s protection barriers.It’s not uncommon for some reports about nuclear facilities to be kept under wraps for national-security reasons, but it does make it difficult for members of the public to check on progress toward preparing nuclear plants for weather events like Florence. And America’s track record with industrial pollution shows there’s reason to want more information about the status of repairs.When Hurricane Harvey struck Houston in 2017, residents complained of “unbearable” chemical smells. It turned out that many of the petrochemical plants in the state had simply not been prepared to withstand the hurricane, and more than 40 plants had released dangerous pollutants, affecting low-income Latino communities that lived nearby. Nuclear plants, too, have a history: Although fatal accidents are rare, the environmental risks associated with nuclear power production and waste have often fallen disproportionately on communities of color—particularly native populations and the poor.Experts say that in a worst-case scenario, in the event of a serious accident at either plant, fast-moving winds and storm surge could carry radioactive fumes or other types of dangerous effluent very far, very quickly, exposing people within a 50-mile radius to radiation and potentially making soil dangerous for crops.Who will be affected if things go south once Florence makes landfall? With Florence, proximity to the power plant matters because you’re at risk for higher exposure to radiation the closer you are, Lochbaum explained. “You’re going to be exposed to more radiation as the wind carries it by,” he said. “The further out you get, that wind tends to get more and more diffuse, so the hazard level for people on the ground as that cloud passes by becomes less and less.”“The radioactive fumes will be moving fast. If the wind takes it 10 miles per hour—how far will it travel, can you imagine?” said Dean Kyne, a sociologist who studies the impact of nuclear disasters at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Adding to that, Florence is likely to bring strong storm surges. Kyne said, “The risk is double because of the water medium. … The storm surge might also carry radioactive effluent—we can’t estimate how far it will go.”So let’s look at the Brunswick plant in North Carolina, 30 miles south of Wilmington. Kyne conducted a demographic analysis in 2014 and found that the 50-mile radius around the plant includes 402,395 people, 79 percent of whom are white, 15 percent black, almost 5 percent Hispanic, nearly 1 percent Asian, and nearly 1 percent Native American. Below are CityLab’s race and income maps of demographics around this plant as of today.(David H. Montgomery/CityLab)(David H. Montgomery/CityLab)The area around Surry, Virginia is more populous and more diverse. In Kyne’s analysis, the population within a 50-mile radius comes to 1.7 million. Around 59 percent are white, 34 percent black, 5 percent Hispanic, and 3 percent Asian. Here are our maps of this area:  (David H. Montgomery/CityLab)(David H. Montgomery/CityLab)In response to questions about preparedness, Richard Zuercher of Dominion Energy, the company that runs the plant in Surry County, told CityLab via email that management had taken steps to make sure that the plant would operate “reliably and safely” during the storm. He added that, generally, “nuclear stations are designed to withstand hurricanes and other natural events such as earthquakes.” According to Surry County’s emergency-services coordinator Ray Phelps, the county held preparation meetings with community members to explain the risks in case the disaster triggers a nuclear emergency.The plant in Wilmington, run by Duke Energy, is the same design and age as the Fukushima power plant, the News & Observer reports, and it identified potential issues in 2012. Karen Williams, a spokesperson for the company, told CityLab: “We are fully prepared for Florence and have no concerns about flooding at this point.”Several nuclear power plants in the path of #HurricaneFlorence https://t.co/gZbLworGVb pic.twitter.com/uStrhg2gCq — Fox News (@FoxNews) September 13, 2018While scientists like Lochbaum are most concerned about these two nuclear plants, there are several others in Florence’s path. In the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, it became clear that as the world urbanizes and populations grow, the threats of breaches from nuclear plants affect more people than ever before. In 2011, an analysis found that the population living within 10-mile emergency planning zones near plants had increased by 17 percent in the previous decade. More recent estimates show that a third of Americans live within 50 miles of a nuclear reactor.Chances are there’s a plant uncomfortably close, and if they fail to withstand extreme weather events, the repercussions could be devastating.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Trouble With TIF

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Local governments often hail this tool as a way to revitalize investment-deprived neighborhoods, fix dilapidated roads, clean up polluted waters, revamp blighted property, and foster commercial activity and job creation. It’s often poorly understood by city taxpayers, but it affects them in very real ways.I’m talking about Tax Increment Financing (TIF), a popular mechanism meant to boost economic development. Its usage is widespread: Every state but one employs it, and it’s a go-to move for many cities trying to revive struggling neighborhoods, especially in the Midwest. But how effective is it, really?The answer, like life itself, is complicated. But David Merriman, a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, takes a stab at it in a new report for the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. After reviewing available research on the implementation and impacts of TIF, Merriman concludes that the mechanism, while helpful in some ways, leaves a lot to be desired.“In the end, it can be a valuable mechanism,” he said. “It’s not something I’d like to get rid of—but it deserves a lot of scrutiny because public sector dollars are being re-routed into a different task, away from general purpose funds.”(Lincoln Institute of Land Policy)To understand what he means, let’s first explain how TIF works: When a city designates an area as a TIF district, the property value of all the real estate within its boundaries at that time is designated as the “base value.” This is the amount that, for a set amount of years after the fact, generates revenue through the city’s property tax process. Everything over and above that, through an increase in value of existing real estate and new development in that time frame, goes into a separate fund earmarked for economic development.The city can then use this second pot of money to lure private investors with loans and subsidies for commercial projects, or to make public projects more attractive. Sometimes, private entities put money on a TIF district even before the revenue comes in, because they’re anticipating revenue from economic development. The overall idea behind TIF is: By creating these districts, cities can spark new private-public partnerships and new economic activity in a region that may not otherwise see it, and by doing that, widen its tax base. It’s economic development that, in a sense, pays for itself.  But in practice, TIF doesn’t always play out that way. Critics often charge that it funnels money out of the taxpayers’ pockets into a special fund that, by and large, works in a pretty opaque manner. While some of that money funds essential public works, much has also gone towards erecting new Whole Foods, renovating glitzy hotels, and building stadiums—the type of projects, one might argue, should not require such incentives. And the evidence Merriman analyzes suggest they may have a point. He shows that, in most cases around the country, the tool did not fulfill its main goal of boosting economic development.“On average, [TIF] may be moving development from one part of the city to another, and changing the timing of the development, but there’s not more development than would have otherwise been made,” Merriman said.In addition, this is a tool with several drawbacks. According to Merriman, TIFs might “capture” some tax revenue above the capped “base value” that may have been generated anyway through natural appreciation in property values if the TIF hadn’t been created. This is money that taxpayers might have otherwise paid directly towards an overlapping school district, or for public services. And while TIF is not a direct tax increase, it may lead to higher rates or service cuts elsewhere, if the city plans on bringing in the same general property tax revenue as before TIF.“If property taxes are higher—if the rates are higher—then the TIF money has come of the taxpayer’s pocket,” Merriman said. “It’s a diversion in that way.”In other words, TIF doesn’t exist in a vacuum. Like other tax incentive programs, it may have the adverse affect of creating competition between neighboring jurisdictions in a way that is not always beneficial—all for outcomes that are mixed, at best.Perhaps the biggest concern with TIF, though, is that of transparency, because of the way this mechanism effectively bypasses the public municipal budget process.“Once a TIF is created, the operation of a TIF receives less scrutiny than other spending,” Merriman said.Take Chicago, where a whopping $660 million—a third of the city’s property taxes—go into its many TIF districts. Back in 2009, Chicago Reader’s Ben Javorsky and Mick Dumke called TIF spending a “shadow budget.” They uncovered documents revealing how the administration of then-Mayor Richard M. Daley used TIF money to revamp skyscrapers and dole out subsidies to large corporations in deals made behind closed doors. Not a lot appears to have changed since then: In 2017, an investigation by Crain’s Chicago Business and the Better Government Association found that under Mayor Rahm Emanuel, $55 million in TIF dollars—ostensibly meant for fighting blight—were spent to renovate Navy Pier, a glitzy waterfront tourist attraction.But TIF is good for sparking public-private partnerships that may help fund useful infrastructure that may not otherwise be appealing to investors, such as raising the height of a bridge tunnel so it can carry large trucks, for example. In the report, Merriman recommends several ways to use this tool more effectively, and make it easier for policymakers and researchers to evaluate. Most important: Cities needs to be more transparent about how they are using TIF. It’s not a magic free-money generator.“It’s a concern about why those decisions are being made,” he said, “and why there’s a public subsidy for development that might have occurred even without the subsidy.”

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Navigator: A Very Silly, Very Serious Map Debate

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Today, something different.Angela Chen, a science journalist at The Verge alerted CityLab to a raging debate on the internet—or at least, on this one Tumblr page. The urgent question: WHAT IS THE RIGHT CARTOGRAPHIC REPRESENTATION OF THE AREA WHERE JASON DERULO KNOWS WHAT GIRLS WANT?Let me explain. In his 2013 hit, “Talk dirty to me,” Mr. Derulo posits:“’Cause I know what the girl them need, New York to Haiti.”And then later:“I know what the girl them want, London to Taiwan”So, what would this proportion of the world where Mr. Derulo claims to know what girls want look like on a map? Two theories emerge. The first:And the alternative:Click through the Tumblr post to analyze the arguments and weigh in. Or, do you have a different theory? Let me know at tmisra@theatlantic.com. Next up: Ludacris.What we’re writing:CityLab’s Sarah Holder recently walked into a mattress store, loved it, and wondered why anyone would buy mattresses online, so she did a little digging. Here’s her story about how the mattress store conquered hearts and minds in America:But the mattress has always been so much more than a space for sleep. “It’s where most people, after all, were conceived and born; where they lay convalescing from illness, made love, and where they died,” said Ekirch of the world’s historical obsession with the bed.More stuff from our website: Barbershop conversations from Mexico City. ¤ In ”Folded Map,” a Chicago artist brings people together across divides. ¤ Behold the sexy pulse of the 1980s transit mall. ¤ Why people are vandalizing public male-only urinals in Paris. (Hint: they’re male-only!) ¤ An artist makes natural ink out of stuff he finds on city tours. ¤ What we’ve been taking in:Chengdu, China: The city that has “emerged as the proving ground for a new generation of Chinese hip-hop artists.” (Guernica) ¤ This is your grandmother’s couch. (Collectors Weekly) ¤ “We are African-American chefs who have come to Ghana to learn about the cooking of our ancestors.” (Bon Appetit) ¤ In defense of men who love minivans. (Mel) ¤ The invisible migrants in Dubai’s vegetable market. (Popula) ¤ Two tribal women from India, two very different fates. (The New Yorker) ¤And finally, here’s a recommendation from our data reporter David Montgomery:The Book of Legendary Lands by the late Umberto Eco (The Name of the Roses, Foucault’s Pendulum), is a field guide to those places that humans have dreamed—or believed—lay just beyond the edge of the map. Some of these are well-known even to this day, such as Atlantis or Dante’s afterlife; others are more obscure, including the Kingdom of a mythical Christian king, Prester John, whose land was said to be far beyond Europe—medieval explorers searched for it first in Asia and then in Africa. And then there are the lands inside the center of the supposedly hollow Earth that some experts believed in more recently than we might care to admit. Eco describes these myths and stories in a style inimitable even in translation. The book itself is lavishly illustrated and thoroughly sourced — a joy to read and a resource to reference.What you’ve been taking in: CityLab readers sent in:¤ A deep dive into Rubacava—“a city of long shadows, papier-mâché skeletons, bright lights and unexpected fogs, where the biggest of the bone bands play the finest bebop tunes, and where jazz and mariachi get married to Andean melodies”—from the video game Grim Fandango. (Polygon)¤ The story of a family that has sold tortas in downtown Mexico City for 70 years. (Culinary Backstreets)View from the ground: @homageproject photographed people milling about the iconic Old Bridge of Mostar in Bosnia & Herzegovina; @davisito.y illuminated silhouettes in Chicago; @spartsuno documented smoke from a fire raging outside their train in Melbourne; @mjmasad93 captured a cloudy day in Amman. Tag us on Instagram with the hashtag #citylabontheground! Over and out, Tanvi

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Chicago, After Rahm

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

On September 7, 2010, Chicago Mayor Richard Daley—the “mayor for life”—announced he would not be seeking reelection to his 7th term in office. On Tuesday, his successor, Rahm Emanuel, made the same move. In a press conference Tuesday morning, he abruptly announced that he was throwing in the towel after two terms: Though Emanuel has already raised millions in campaign funds, he said he would not be running again.“The time has come to make another tough choice,” Emanuel said at Chicago’s city hall, flanked by his wife, Amy Rule. “This has been the job of a lifetime, but it's not the job for a lifetime.”The announcement came as a surprise even to insiders, and raised several questions—some to do with Emanuel himself, and others with the fate of the city he oversaw during two tumultuous terms in office.First up: So why’d he do it? And why now? Well, for one, his prospects in this mayoral race were looking pretty bleak. According to Tom Bowen, who served as Emanuel’s deputy campaign manager in 2011 and the director of his political action committee until 2013, there had long been signs that this election was going to be a hard one for Emanuel. After Donald Trump took the presidency and Republican Bruce Rauner won the gubernatorial seat in Illinois, Chicago seemed as if it might be ready for a change. “It's not a great environment for any incumbent,” he said. “Voters were clearly very frustrated.”A lot of that had to do with Emanuel himself, of course. He had been languishing in the polls—and not just because of his famously quick temper, which he had the habit of letting loose around reporters. In his two terms, he oversaw dramatic tax hikes, shuttering of mental health clinics, union strikes, public school closings, population loss, a spike in violent crime, and reports of egregious police misconduct.“I don't believe any single issue is the biggest driver of this decision. It took all these things coming together in a perfect storm,” said Bowen, who now runs a political consulting firm.The shooting death of unarmed Laquan McDonald was surely a turning point, though. When a court ordered the release of the video footage of the 16 shots officer Jason Van Dyke fired into the 17-year-old, floodgates of anger in the city flung wide open. Investigations revealed how Emanuel’s administration had screwed up. Thousands of documents on police misconduct were released. Emanuel’s ratings tanked. And while he never heeded calls to resign, his opponents persisted, and grew louder. Today’s announcement, in the eyes of many Chicagoans, is a win for local criminal justice activists.Shoutout to all the grassroots orgs like @AssataDaughters @BYP_100 and many others that pushed for accountabily and resignation from Rahm. His announcement to not run however, is not Justice for Laquan McDonald, only convicting muderer Jason Van Dyke can bring that. — Chance The Rapper (@chancetherapper) September 4, 2018I believe we will replace him w/ someone better. But I also believe firmly that this is a victory NOW, TODAY. He looked at the writing on the wall & it was a bad scene. And that’s because of the hard work , sacrifice, and powerful organizing of a LOT of people. I’m proud of that. https://t.co/cEHVMeEMEf — wikipedia brown aka eve ewing aka lil muji pen (@eveewing) September 4, 2018But if Emanuel had remained so stubborn on this issue of running, why make this announcement now? As Fran Spielman from the Chicago Sun-Times wrote last week, he was nearing a political deadline of sorts, as the Jason Van Dyke murder trial approached:If Emanuel waits much longer, he will risk looking like his political future is being dictated by the outcome of the trial of Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is charged with the murder of Laquan McDonald.Still, despite all of these disadvantages, it was widely believed that he’d stay in the race; he may have been unpopular, but he was—and still is—extremely powerful. Former presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton have served as allies and advisors. He also has deep pockets: For his mayoral bid, he raised five times the amount ten of his rivals raised together. For all of these reasons, some on Twitter speculated today that he might be eyeing the 2020 presidential race. Whether or not that turns out to be true, it’s clear he is not likely to disappear into the background.“Obviously the guy’s got $10 million dollars in his campaign war chest, so he's going to be a player moving forward,” said Ron Holmes, a political strategist in Chicago with ten years of experience in Illinois politics.The race for the future of his office, meanwhile, is turning into an open rush. The already-large pool of candidates is about to get bigger, with more and more city officials expressing interest in throwing their names in the hat. Although it’s much too early to say who is likely to emerge as the frontrunner in the 2019 race, some point to Lori Lightfoot—a progressive, female candidate of color with criminal justice credentials—as someone who may have the right profile.The bottom line is that Chicago is hungry for someone who can offer a vision for the future of the city that is clearly different from Emanuel’s, but also stands strong on its own, experts said. This candidate will need to have the infrastructure in place to organize, to rally the support of Chicago’s diverse voting blocs, and to strengthen the city from the bottom up.“I think what voters in Chicago want is similar to what they want nationally—they want things to be better; They want their government to look like them and to reflect their values,” said Bowen. “So it’ll take someone offering a progressive vision, but a vision that’s different from what’s gotten them into that mess.”

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Kerala Floods: A Disastrous Consequence of Unchecked Urbanization

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

On Wednesday, Cochin International Airport reopened. For two weeks the airport in the city of Kochi had been closed after being inundated with waters from a flood that ravaged the Indian state, Kerala, killing over 400 people. Bridges collapsed, forests fell, and homes were swept away in landslides. In addition to the devastating loss of life, the recovery and reconstruction cost is estimated to be billions of dollars.  This was not the first, or even the second time, a flood has wreaked such havoc in India—and it is likely not the last. Every time a disaster like this hits, Indian politicians from opposing parties quibble about the relief efforts, but there is seldom a meaningful discussion about the fact that these disasters were, at least in part, man-made: a result of haphazard urbanization and badly planned water management infrastructure.Environmentalists point to Kochi’s airport as a prime example of a structure built without prior risk assessment. To show its issues, Samrat Basak, the director of the World Resource Institute’s Urban Water Program, conducted a quick satellite analysis. The first problem: The airport was built a few hundred meters away from the Periyar River, and to make space for it, natural water channels were realigned."It is too close to the river, that's point number one,” Basak told CityLab, “and it's not just the Kochi airport: Even the Mumbai and the Chennai airports are too close to the river, and they've experienced flooding in the past.”The second issue was evident when WRI analyzed the elevation analysis. Not only is the airport at river level, it was lower than some of the areas in the North, which means it acted like a collection tray for runoff from the north when the downpour hit.“So if there's a flood, it will breach the airport boundaries—you don't need to be a scientist or an architect to understand [that],” Basak said.Basak’s analysis also mentions that urban areas like Palakkad, Chengannur, and Angamaly were also submerged because many of them have developed on flood plains. And Aluva, a suburb of Kochi that began sprouting in the 1990s, has been sprawling into the flood plain without a buffer to withstand overflow from the river.A flood victim is buried in Paravur, in the state of Kerala on August 21. (Sivaram V/Reuters)The other factor here, according to WRI, is that hydro-power dams that supply more than half of the electricity in Kerala are spread out across the state. These massive structures have been built without any plans for overflowing reservoirs, without emergency protocols for potential collapses, and without warning systems if any of these eventualities come to bear, a a 2017 government audit warned. It seems Kerala’s vulnerability is not an exception, but a rule, according to the audit. The consequence was that these reservoirs were brimming with water even before the monsoons hit, Basak noted, and so when it did, all of the water was released at the same time.With recent research measuring a three-fold increase in extreme rain since the 1950s, a finding that is consistent with climate change forecasts, WRI emphasizes an urgent need to preempt these risks.“That’s a chronic problem in India—that we’re more reactive than proactive,” Basak said.This tendency may be because preemptive measures require significant investment, or just that urban development has been happening at such dizzying speed in India since the early 1990s that lawmakers can’t keep up. Climate change is also largely overlooked in discussions about urban planning.”Most Indian cities are facing challenges around extreme events or lack of water because of these three reasons,” Basak said.WRI recommends ways in which India and its cities can be proactive about the risk of floods from monsoons or extreme weather events: conservation of natural flood buffers such as tree cover, more sustainable urban development, and resilient infrastructure are some solutions. The bottom line is: the recourse requires a shift in mentality.“Urban development and sustainability of cities should not be in a conflict—it should go hand in hand,” Basak said. “That’s where we need to work quite a lot, as policymakers and thought leaders.”

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Militarization of Local Police Isn’t Making Anyone Safer

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

After a police officer killed 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014, Ferguson erupted. One image from the unrest shows the silhouette of a solitary man standing with his hands up in front of a row of armored vehicles, eliciting comparisons with the “tank man” from the Tiananmen Square. In another image—this time from the Baton Rouge, Louisiana, after the shooting of Alton Sterling in 2016—a woman stands serene, while two police officers in heavy-duty gear approach her.For many Americans, it is perhaps in these moments that the extent to which local police departments have militarized became evident. Law enforcement have often requested military-grade equipment in the aftermath of police shootings, arguing that these weapons protect them and increase public safety; whereas critics have argued that they will further strain trust between the police and communities, making bad situations much worse.So which is it?A comprehensive new study published in the National Academy of Sciences provides some answers. For it, Jonathan Mummolo, a professor of politics and public affairs at Princeton University, used a public records request to obtain data on every SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) deployment in Maryland, information that had been recorded due to a state statute.Upon analyzing it, he found a strong correlation between SWAT deployments and the share of black residents in a locale, even after controlling for crime rates, and other social and economic characteristics of the place (unemployment, education, household income). A 10 percent increase in the percentage of black residents in a neighborhood is associated with a 10.53 percent increase in SWAT deployments per 100,000 residents during the time period he examined. Around 90 percent of times, the SWAT officers were deployed to serve a warrant. These results from Maryland “are consistent with the descriptive claim that Black residents face a pronounced risk of experiencing militarized policing,” Mummolo writes in the report.Next, he tackled a claim often cited by proponents of higher militarization: that more military grade weapons are beneficial because they help avert violent crime and ensure the safety of police officers. This was the rationale given when the Tump administration walked back an Obama-era rule limiting the transfer of military equipment to local police in 2017.“Those restrictions went too far,”Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in a speech at the time. “We will not put superficial concerns above public safety.”To test that theory, Mummolo uses a combination of data sets with information on the location of 9,000 law enforcement agencies that have SWAT teams, and finds, well, nothing: “I find no evidence that obtaining or deploying a SWAT team reduces local crime rates or lowers the rates at which officers are killed or assaulted.”Third, he takes a stab at sussing out the psychological effects of seeing officers in heavy military gear through survey experiments. When shown images of heavily geared-up officers versus those who are in ordinary police uniform, respondents tended to support the former less. (The survey sample contained a larger share of African Americans, because this group is more likely to see SWAT teams.) Mummolo concludes:“These results suggest that the often-cited trade-off between public safety and civil liberties is, in the case of militarized policing, a false choice.”Edward Lawson Jr., a researcher at the University of Southern California, also finds detrimental effects of police militarization in his recent research. He uses the receipt of surplus military equipment as a measure for police militarization, and finds that where militarization increased, so did deaths of suspected civilians. In a blog post on the London School of Economics U.S. Center site, he writes:Militarized police departments see themselves not as public servants upholding the law, but as an army fighting a war against a dangerous and invisible enemy and occupying territory that is hostile to them. To carry out these actions, the leaders of those departments desire military equipment—vehicles, weapons, body armor, and so forth—because it provides better protection from the enemy and promotes both more efficient use of force and more fear among the public. And, when departments are more militarized, their officers should kill more people.Both researchers stress that militarization entails more than the equipment and tactics. Mummolo’s analysis focuses on SWAT deployment for most part, but to him, militarization is about “a culture that centers on violent conflict.” Lawson describes it similarly, as a “psychological process” that condones, and even encourages violence, as the solution. That’s important when considering the efforts of many cities to demand public oversight over their local police department’s desire for shiny new guns.Even if they succeed in limiting the BearCats, MRAPs, M4 rifles, and LRADs, it’s not clear that the culture of militarization and using violent force is likely to shift any time soon.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Navigator: The Return of ‘Risky’ Play

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

In New Delhi, we didn’t really have playgrounds in public spaces—at least not when I was growing up. Still, around 5 p.m. in our neighborhood, all the kids would spill out into the streets and claim territory: a swath of the grassy zone in the middle, a section of the parking lot, or the alleyway behind the apartment complexes. We’d play unattended—free to transform the sole big Banyan tree into a whole enchanted forest; the parking lot into a professional badminton court; and the alleyway into an “obstacle course” to race our bikes through.The American playground, when I first visited as a child, was a stark contrast. I remember walking tentatively onto a rubberized floor of one near my parent’s friends’ house in Long Island, and wondering if I’d stepped onto the skin of a basketball.It was fascinating, therefore, to write about a recent push against the cookie-cutter playground by many child development experts, parents, and play activists around the world. They are arguing for the need to rethink what “risk” looks like, and question whether it’s actually good for kids when it is completely removed. Check it out here and let me know what you think at tmisra@theatlantic.com.What we’re writing:The selective Singapore of Crazy Rich Asians. ¤ What’s so crazy about this politician from New Zealand biking to the hospital to give birth? ¤ The New York Public Library unveils Instagram novels! ¤ “The all-white bikes, placed at locations of fatal crashes, serve as an infrastructure of grief—part memorial, part protest symbol.” ¤ What the future of Aretha Franklin’s Memphis house looks like. ¤ Unpacking the roommate relationship. ¤ “If someone asked me five years ago whether or not I thought the open-concept floor plan would still be popular, I would have said no.” ¤(Janice Chang)CityLab contributor Feargus O’Sullivan also wrote a beautiful essay about how an evening class he took changed the way he experienced his city:I can’t pretend that my life in London has changed beyond recognition since starting the course—I haven’t even officially graduated yet—but something has shifted. Not only did it expand my community, it expanded my willingness to finding more of it in unexpected places. I didn’t discover a specific space as such; the shift for me has been more about an attitude of openness. Now, when people talk to me in passing in the street, I let myself linger and listen. When some new opportunity comes up, as an experiment, I say yes. Above all, I look at the people around me differently, being slower to jump to what I now see as essentially mechanical, learned suspicion or judgement.What we’ve been taking in:A sample of background music at various New York City spots: bars, subway stops, electronic stores, and more. (New York Times)  ¤ “H Mart is the bridge that guides me away from the memories that haunt me.” (The New Yorker) ¤ Writer Jesmyn Ward on returning home. (Time)  ¤ Watching urban planners play Sim City is so satisfying. (Fast Company) ¤ “North Carolina very well could be a very different place—one where more people live longer and are not constantly on the edge of sickness and poverty.” (Splinter) ¤ The upside of getting bedbugs. (Vice) ¤ The wild, wild churches of Kerala, India. (Arch Daily) ¤ “This is the result of a lifetime spent chewing paan, a substance that occupies a space somewhere between a snack and a drug — a space left vacant in the West.” (Popula) ¤ What this repository of propaganda comic books tells us about South African apartheid. (Africa is a Country) ¤ Giving directions in a changing Brooklyn. (Places Journal) ¤  “Why did so many cities I visited feel so damn similar?” (New York) ¤ And here’s a recommendation from one of our new fellows, Nicole Javorsky:This summer, writer Patti Smith dropped me through a portal and I came out on the other side into cafés in cities around the globe—from New York City to Mexico City to Tokyo. Her book, M Train, relishes the sweet-somber feeling of reading at coffee shops. I admit: I actually cried at Peet's Coffee in D.C. when I read the final pages. If you're someone who feels blissfully achy when sitting at cafés alone, Smith's words will give you camaraderie.What you’ve been taking in:Here are some recommendations CityLab readers made via Twitter:¤ On life in Alaska.¤ Home, through cups of tea.¤ Chinatown architecture is rooted in American ideas of China.¤ Excavating inequality in Atlanta.View from the ground: @urban_cat89 captured the roofs and colors of Oslo through the trees; Your city’s park probably doesn’t live up to Sioux Falls,’ which @joshnh4h shot at dusk; You can stare at a city, but @kurgae showed that it can stare right back; @tlaloc1977 documented a low-traffic intersection in Havana. Tag us on Instagram with the hashtag #citylabontheground! Over and out, Tanvi

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: After Job Loss, Living Near Parents Helps Adults Recover

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Young adults take a huge hit if they get laid off. Even 20 years on, their earnings may not fully recover. But those who live near their parents tend to bounce back more quickly—within 10 years, they can make up what they lost in earnings.A new analysis by the Cleveland Federal Reserve finds that this isn’t just a correlation: Having parents nearby is why some adults rebound faster. That’s mainly because parents provide a crucial type of support: childcare.The study finds that for young adults without kids, proximity to their parents didn’t really matter in how they fared after a job loss. But for those who were parents themselves, it made a huge difference. Via the report:We find that the positive earnings effect is concentrated among workers who have children of their own, a situation which suggests that the parents’ help in caring for the grandchildren is important in achieving the healthier earnings recovery.Childcare can be a major expense and often ends up taking up a bigger chunk of the family budget than even rent. It can cost anywhere from $407 a month in Mississippi to $1,886 a month in Washington, D.C. And if parents live in one of the many “childcare deserts,” they may have to pay even more—in time and money—to drop their kids off at daycare that’s out of the way. For all these reasons, this kind of support is often out of the question for working families.It’s obvious, then, why having parents nearby is such a boon. It functions sort of like a safety net, allowing people the time and resources to get their careers back on track—to go to job interviews, invest in new skills, or go back to school. Parents can also help by setting their kids up with new jobs at their own place of work, or by connecting them with employment opportunities elsewhere. What the study couldn’t find support for is whether parents’ ability to provide housing is a factor. Other research, however, has shown the benefits of young adults moving back in with parents during periods of economic uncertainty.Ultimately, the takeaway of the Cleveland Federal Reserve study isn’t that young adults who have kids—or want to have kids—need to pack up a U-Haul and move closer to mom and dad. In fact, doing that comes with some tradeoffs. According to the authors, people living near their parents who haven’t experienced job loss actually tend to make less money, on average, than those living further away. So it’s possible that some young adults are missing out on more fruitful career opportunities by choosing—or being compelled—to live closer to their families.    What the authors suggest is that policymakers need to start thinking about ways to increase access to the kind of support parents provide for young adults, so that they are not derailed by job losses. The report doesn’t go into how costly it would be to provide such services, but it does mention European countries as having unemployment policies that integrate a variety of services:To address issues with childcare, job seekers could be paired with flexible, subsidized childcare services that could support them through their job search into the first few months of new job.Some private companies have started seeing the benefits of on-site childcare: If parents know their kids are safe, they’re much more likely to be able to focus on work and be more productive. But an investment in child care subsidies at a larger scale could extend those benefits to the entire economy.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Can Risky Playgrounds Take Over the World?

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

The information age has ushered in an era of fear about children's well-being, shifting norms heavily towards constant oversight and nearly impossible standards of safety. One casualty of that trend has been the playground, which has become mind-numbingly standard-issue—with the same type of plastic swing sets and slides—designed to minimize harm, rather than maximize enjoyment.Over the last few years, however, pushback against the overly sanitized playground has grown considerably, with new research supporting the importance of play—especially unstructured play—for early childhood development. Critics also argue that concerns about actual harm are overstated. These findings have raised questions about playground design. Is the current playground model fostering creativity, independence, and problem-solving? What does risk really mean—and when is it OK? What can alternatives to current play spaces look like? And how can their benefits extend to all children in a city? Architects, researchers, childhood development specialists, and parents are weighing in on these questions around the world, and outlining a new vision for the future of play.“The take-home message for municipalities is: Stop setting your bar at the level of the most anxious parent. If you do that, you're guaranteed to produce boring and dull playgrounds,” said Tim Gill, a London-based researcher and advocate who recently authored a white paper on faulty assumptions about risky playgrounds. “If you set your bar at the level of the average parent or maybe even at the level of the parents … who do want some more excitement and challenge in their kids’ lives, then, things start to look different.”The adventure playground is emerging as an alternative to the boring, albeit “safe,” play areas for kids—particularly in the U.S. and the U.K. These are spaces that look like scrap yards, with loose tires, blocks of wood, rope, and tools like hammers and nails, where children are free to build and destroy their surroundings as they choose. They can even set fires.Reilly Wilson is the board chair of nonprofit play:groundNYC, which runs an adventure playground on Governors Island in New York City. There, parents are only allowed in the section for very young children. The older kids play under the watch of “play workers” who are trained to analyze the quality of risk, asking: Is this something the child will learn from or is this something that will hurt the child? They rarely have to intervene because children are making the same determinations themselves. According to Wilson, knowing that they’re in a high-risk environment makes kids pay more attention, whereas super sanitized environments may have the opposite effect. That’s why she rejects the claims that adventure playgrounds are “risky” spaces, full of uncertainty.“A lot of times in environments designed for children, all the risk has been removed and they're made very aware of that,” said Wilson. “So then they do things which are actually more dangerous than the environments weren't designed to accommodate.”“It is actually incredibly easy to insure those types of play environments as long as you have properly trained staff who are constantly risk-assessing,” she added.An adventure playground on Governors Island in New York City. (play:groundNYC)Adventure playgrounds are part of a new approach, led by Australia, Canada, and the U.K., that puts risk back in the mix in public spaces. Is it working? According to some metrics, yes. Philadelphia-based architect Meghan Talarowski surveyed 16 playgrounds in London, gathering information from 18,000 people. These were playgrounds with a variety of surfaces, including combinations of sand, grass, water, and paved ground. The features were uniquely designed and arranged so that kids could crawl through faux caves, climb boulders, hop on and off a trail of wooden pads, swing wildly, or play organized sports. What Talarowski found was that these types of playgrounds had 53 percent more visitors than America’s cookie cutter ones, and children are up to 18 percent more physically active. They were also cheaper and safer.The idea of “risky” play is not just gaining traction in Western countries. Even in India, where formal playgrounds are not as common, advocates are using the government’s Smart Cities push to make space for tiered, multi-purpose playgrounds. Some plans for parks in Bhubaneswar city incorporate splash parks, sand boxes, walls that children can paint, and amphitheaters.In Taiwan, parents are the ones leading the change. Christine Lee from Taipei is a young mother of a 4-year-old and a 2-year-old who has rallied against the government’s decision to replace the concrete slides, high climbing towers, and spinners they had before with boring, sub-standard equipment compliant with Chinese standards. She’s started a 50-person-strong non-profit called Parks and Playgrounds For Children By Children. The government has now invited her collective to become a part of the design process. “We had our Taipei revolution, and the New Taipei revolution (the) next year,” she said. “After two years, it’s island-wide.”New construction is underway on Governors Island. (play:groundNYC)Gill recently authored a white paper poking holes in the faulty assumptions about risk in playgrounds. “This paper comes from a realization that many grown-ups have gotten confused about what playgrounds are for—they’ve kind of been under the delusion that it was possible to create playgrounds where no injuries ever happen,” he says of the study, which was commissioned by the Bernard van Leer Foundation, an organization that supports interventions for early childhood development in cities. (Disclosure: The Bernard Van Leer Foundation is also providing funding for CityLab’s reporting on raising young kids in cities.) “Let’s get clear about what playgrounds are for, and why it’s good for children to have that challenge and uncertainty and risk—and then let's talk about how you can strike a good balance.”According to Gill, all risks aren’t the same—some should be addressed directly and others should be avoided entirely. Trying to build a playground with the goal of removing uncertainty altogether is not only futile, it’s also counterproductive, and removes the potential for teaching kids skills they’ll need to navigate the real world.As children grow, “they become better risk managers,” Gill said. “That journey is best made in gradual steps by allowing children to have some freedom and some control over how to figure out what's the best way to deal with tricky or uncertain situations.”While the conversation around “risky” play is growing, cities continue to be held back by a deep fear of lawsuits—even though Gill’s research shows that actual cases of litigation are extremely rare in Europe and Canada. America is more litigious, but even there, costs are relatively low. New York City paid only 0.4 percent of its total liability payments in a nine-year period because of playground incidents, according to Gil’s research. Local governments have nevertheless clung to rigid industry standards for playground equipment that often may have more to do with commercial interests than safety, Gill said. He and others are pushing cities around the world to examine their own risk-benefit criteria, and plan playgrounds using clear data on what children want and need to grow.For Wilson, cities that want to support adventure playgrounds need to carve out some money in their budgets for staffing. But to make play more inclusive, cities need to think beyond playgrounds altogether. These may not cater to everyday needs of children—and may not be accessible to kids who don’t have the luxury of having parents or caregivers to cart them around, she said. Apart from instituting better urban design that lends itself to play in the streets, she added, local governments could shut down certain streets so kids can play near their homes; put up a climbing wall at the public library that has an after-school program; and link up play with school lunch programs, to give a few examples. Lastly, while cities are paranoid of certain types of perceived “risk,” they ignore a key reason why parents of color restrict their children’s outdoors play time: harsh policing. Creating more playful cities requires a reckoning with broader systemic issues.“The conversation, I think, really needs to move beyond just physical risks,” said Wilson.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Why Should Cities Bear the Cost of Trump’s Rallies?

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Friday was one of those mornings when Donald Trump directed his Twitter ire at a mayor.This time, Donald Trump blamed the cancellation of the military parade he had slotted for Veterans’ Day in D.C. on “local politicians,” arguing that the District of Columbia quoted too high a price to host such an event. Mayor Muriel Bowser embraced that accusation:Yup, I’m Muriel Bowser, mayor of Washington DC, the local politician who finally got thru to the reality star in the White House with the realities ($21.6M) of parades/events/demonstrations in Trump America (sad). https://t.co/vqC3d8FLqx — MurielBowser (@MurielBowser) August 17, 2018Bowser brings up a point that’s plagued a lot of other U.S. mayors: Cities have often ended up underwriting Trump rallies, even though they’ve been saddled with some pretty hefty costs in the aftermath.Several municipalities learned this the hard way in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election, when they hosted the Trump, Clinton, and Sanders campaigns. A Center for Public Integrity investigation of federal campaign and municipal records found that as of 2017, around three dozen municipalities had not been paid. The Trump campaign, in particular, was responsible for at least $204,000 in unpaid security bills. These costs include police and fire department staffing hours and overtime for security and traffic control, the cost of equipment such as barricades, and even in some cases, utility costs and media relations.Tucson, Arizona, racked up over $80,000 (double what the Sanders rally had cost the previous day); Spokane, Washington: around $65,000; and Eau Claire, Wisconsin: $47,000. And these are just some of the cities that have complained about being left with the bill for a Trump rally. It’s not always clear who foots the bill when presidents or presidential hopefuls come to town, but in the case of Tucson, the Trump campaign manager had signed a prior agreement to cover the costs of security. Still, no dice.“You are responsible for these payments,” Tucson City Attorney Mike Rankin wrote to the Trump campaign in a letter obtained by the Center for Public Integrity. Rankin did not rule out a lawsuit.According to a recent study by University of Pennsylvania, cities hosting Trump rallies saw higher numbers of assaults than those hosting other presidential candidates, which means they come with additional public safety concerns and often the need for heightened security measures. In 2016, Trump cancelled a rally in Chicago after pro- and anti-Trump protesters clashed. In many cases, attendees and campaign staffers have been charged with assaulting dissenters and journalists. Trump himself has made statements encouraging security officers to remove hecklers and supporters to “knock the crap out of” dissenters. After the Chicago rally was cancelled, security expert Juliette Kayyem— a professor at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and a former assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in the Obama administration—wrote in an op-ed for CNN: ..while I believe that all of the blame rests on Donald Trump himself -- a man who speaks of leadership while taking no responsibility for the impact of his words -- that fact is absolutely irrelevant for public safety agencies. For future events, mayors and police chiefs must simply assume the worst and build a safety apparatus around that. Any failure to plan makes police act in ways that are completely inconsistent with the minimal threat the protesters pose.This advice remains relevant because Trump hasn’t stopped campaigning, even though he’s now president. In 2017, Trump held a rally in Phoenix that saddled the city’s taxpayers with $450,000 in traffic, security, and utility costs—riling up opposing politicians and local taxpayers.“It's 2017. He just won in 2016. This shouldn't be something that the city of Phoenix should pay for,” Arizona Democratic Party spokesman Enrique Gutierrez told The Arizona Republic at the time.  The topic became particularly contentious at a city council meeting in Phoenix earlier this year, when citizens petitioned to withhold city resources on future Trump events and criticized the heavy-handed police response towards counter-protesters. The city council unanimously rejected the proposals, although some members brought up the need to look into whether these costs can be reimbursed.Even though Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton asked the president to delay the rally for fear of violence, he later told The Phoenix New Times that his city nonetheless had a responsibility to provide the necessary security.“When it comes to public safety, we have an obligation to provide public safety services to any dignitary visiting our community,” he said.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Navigator: Living Abroad

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

I moved to Philadelphia in 2006 for college. Then home to New Delhi in 2010. Then back to America, to Chicago in 2012. In 2013, I headed to D.C. That’s where I have lived since, barring a a brief stint in London in 2014.All that’s to say that I’ve had the privilege of living in the U.S. for  many years now; long enough that it’s hard for me, at this point, to consider America “abroad.” It has been confusing at times—I’ve definitely wallowed in angst, lamenting about whether I belong anywhere. Bu...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Rising Criminalization of Black Girls

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

The kids are not alright—well, not all of them.In Washington, D.C., the percentage of young black girls entering the juvenile justice system has risen dramatically, even as that of young black boys has decreased. Young black girls are now likely to be arrested at 30 times the rate of white boys and girls together, according to a new report by the advocacy group Rights4Girls and the Georgetown Juvenile Justice Initiative.“Girls of color are dealing with challenges posed by racism but they're also...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: The Hidden Workers of New Delhi’s Shiny Satellite City

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

As the Indian capital, New Delhi, has grown in recent decades, surrounding states have sprouted urban offshoots speckled with gated high-rise apartment complexes, glitzy office buildings, and fancy malls.The most well-known example is Gurgaon, or as it likes to call itself, the “Millennium City”—a suburb often positioned as the future of urban India. It’s a metropolis created by private developers where companies, not local governments, serve the municipal needs of the residents. As people spill...

Database Proof Substratum: Can London Become a People-Centric Smart City?

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

In his speech at the South By Southwest festival in Austin, London Mayor Sadiq Khan cautioned the world about the perils of the ongoing tech revolution: Social media has helped proliferate fake news, popularized online hate speech, and created ideological silos. Tech companies seeking to disrupt the status quo have had negative, unintended consequences, he said. “There’s been a dereliction of duty on the part of politicians and policymakers to ensure that the rapid growth in technology is utiliz...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Navigator: Ode To The Dead Mall

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

This week, something different—or perhaps, intensely familiar—via my friend and colleague Mark Byrnes:Rockville’s White Flint Mall was a big deal in the D.C.-area when it opened up in 1977. But by the time this early-aughts Montgomery County teen was participating in the Mall Lifestyle, White Flint felt second-class to, say, the Montgomery Mall (now known as Westfield Montgomery), where the rich kids had cultivated a see-and-be-seen environment.To me and my fellow kids, White Flint’s food court ...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: What the DOJ’s Lawsuit Could Mean for ‘Sanctuary’ Laws

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Jeff Sessions has launched his most potent attack yet in his salvo against so-called “sanctuary” policies—escalating the attorney general’s ongoing war against the Golden State.“California, we have a problem,” Sessions said Wednesday in remarks delivered in Sacramento. “Contrary to what you might hear from the lawless open borders radicals, we are not asking California, Oakland, or anyone else to enforce immigration laws...We are simply asking California and other sanctuary jurisdictions to stop...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: How Cities Are Fighting Secret Surveillance

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A local government. A powerful private entity with controversial technology. A secret deal. This time, in New Orleans.On Tuesday, The Verge revealed that Peter Thiel’s software company, Palantir, has been piloting a predictive policing technology in New Orleans for the past six years. Until The Verge’s story, the program was completely unknown not only to the public, but also to city council members.The program, like a similar program in Chicago, pulls information from a variety of law enforceme...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: How Cities Are Divided By Income, Mapped

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

In Philly’s Center City live its richest residents—those who can pay the premium for that walkable, amenity-rich, green neighborhood. But just across the river, blocks away from the lush, expanding campuses of the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University, the visual landscape of the city changes: Pawn shops, fast food eateries, boarded-up store fronts, and dilapidated houses. Only a few areas in West Philadelphia have become more prosperous (and whiter). The rest continue to suffer conce...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Navigator: City of Joy

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

We could all use some joy. So here’s a dispatch from NOLA—a city that has seen its troubles, but where the streets continue to be speckled with laughter, music, conversations, and color. Via my officemate/pal Linda Poon: While the rest of America was transported to the wonders of Wakanda’s Golden City, I (physically) headed over to New Orleans. (It just so happens to be the home of Hannah Beachler, the visionary designer behind “Black Panther’s” fictional kingdom!) When you’re there, it’s easy t...

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Mapping Trump’s Immigration Crackdown—And The Local Response to It

27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 4974
27 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4700

Gendrome Editors' Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

As soon Donald Trump took office, his administration started on his primary promise: A crackdown on undocumented immigrants.On his command, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) widened the dragnet—targeting, essentially, anyone without papers, even if they had not committed serious crimes. The emphasis shifted beyond the border region, with federal immigration authorities using workplace and other raids to round up undocumented immigrants. Young people who were previously exempt from deport...