Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: A Meal Fit for a King

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A bitten bone shows how a young tyrannosaur fed. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Astronomers Think They Can Explain Mysterious Cosmic Bursts

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A new, testable theory proposes that fast radio bursts may draw their power from young neutron stars called magnetars.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Woman shocked to learn ‘kidney stones’ was actually labor

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Ally Opfer had no idea she was pregnant�until she found herself giving birth in the emergency room being prepped for a c-section.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Looking for Nemo

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Kids movies shape the way we look at the world long after we leave the theater -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: CVS to change on-hold music after Massachusetts doctor pleads with company to change it

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Dr. Steven Schlozman, a Massachusetts doctor, is getting his wish after he pleaded with CVS to change its on-hold jingle.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Okay, Maybe Proofs Aren’t Dying After All

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Two experts argue that proofs are doing fine, contrary to a controversial 1993 prediction of their impending demise -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Weekend reads: Journal editor fired for homophobic comments; “three-parent baby� paper mega-correction; the Bette Midler journal club

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Before we present this weekâ€s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured plagiarism by a priest; retraction of a creationist paper “published … Continue reading Weekend reads: Journal editor fired for homophobic comments; “three-parent baby” paper mega-correction; the Bette Midler journal club

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Violence Propels Ebola Outbreak Toward 1,000 Cases

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Surging conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is hampering efforts to stamp out the virus -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Navigator: I Love Airports!

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Itâ€s 6:47 a.m. on Friday as I write this, and I am more than four hours early for my international flight. (I mixed up the departure time with the arrival time!)Light from the brightening sky has been pooling into the previously dark waiting area of Dulles International Airport, where I have been sitting, waiting to check in. An Indian family across from me is trying to entertain a fussy toddler. Behind me, an airport employee speaks to someone (a friend? a sister?) on the speakerphone in a mix of West African French and English. From time to time, her walkie-talkie bleeps and stern voices crackle through. In the background, Blondieâ€s “Heart of Glassâ€� is playing, but because Iâ€m so sleepy, it takes me a few minutes to identify the song.I love this airport; Iâ€ve come to admire its handsome brutalist slopes and edges; its remoteness from central Washington, D.C.â€�although inconvenientâ€�makes it seem like Iâ€m already far away. And while the security lines arenâ€t fun, people watching here always is.Generally, too, I find airports fascinatingâ€�they function as mini-cities, planned with security, commerce, and mobility in mind. But theyâ€re also portals to other worldsâ€�borderlands with their own set of rules. They all reflect the unique aspects of the places theyâ€re in, but theyâ€re also sort of all the same.According to French anthropologist Marc Augé, airports are places of “solitude and similitude,â€� where every person who passes through becomes reduced to a roleâ€�theyâ€re passengers or pilots before theyâ€re people. But in a blog post for the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, author Jenifer Van Vleck disagrees, arguing that an airport is “a deeply social spaceâ€�and, indeed, an emotionally charged space.â€�As I look at the screen to check on the departure time for my flight to India, I realize my love for airports draws from all of these theories. I love the anonymity and time-warping quality of the space; but also enjoy observing human moments that appear particularly stark against the sterility of the place. Most of all, I love the feeling of being in motion. Like Alain de Botton writes in his book, A Week at the Airport, airports offer “promises of alternative lives, to which we might appeal at moments of claustrophobia and stagnation.â€�A colorful mock-up of the Mexico City international airport. (Eduardo Verdugo/AP)What weâ€re writing:Are dog parks… exclusionary? ¤ Why Toledo just gave Lake Erie legal rights. ¤ Finding a writerâ€s voice in Lagos. ¤ These Parisiens have had it with people who want to Instagram their street. ¤ Pune is turning buses into public bathrooms for women. ¤ Want to fight a pipeline? Live in a tree. ¤And remember that sampling of public transit textiles I previewed in the last edition of Navigator? CityLabâ€s Feargus Oâ€Sullivan has now written a much more comprehensive, global review of public transit fabrics.What weâ€re taking in:https://giphy.com/umairanwar/The feminist history of the tea room. (JSTOR Daily) ¤ “Convinced that becoming skooliesâ€�people who live mobile lives in converted school busesâ€�would afford them freedom and adventure, they sprung for a white 36-foot 1995 Thomas Built Saf-T-Liner for $4,500.â€� (Curbed) ¤ “I could see how big the city was, that we were a small part of something larger. It comforted me. â€� (Catapult) ¤ How does one map a myth like Homerâ€s Odyssey? (Lapham Quarterly) ¤ Solangeâ€s new album is “made in Houston and steeped in its hyper-local culture.â€� (NPR) ¤ “We honour our concrete just like people honour their trees.â€� (The Discourse) ¤ How the Census was manipulated. (The Baffler) ¤ Liberty City memorializes lost loved ones on T-shirts. (Topic) ¤ A Norwegian town called “Å.â€� (Popula) ¤ This Kolkata artist is creating traditional Patachitra art, but with urban scenes from modern India. (Scroll.in) ¤ View from the ground:@axlaxlaxlaxlaxl strolled by the Palace of Fine Arts Theatre in San Francisco. @yasminedagher highlighted the warm rooftops of Beirut. @ethan.k56 captured the waterfront views in New Orleans. @helloimhelen enjoyed the sunny Houston weather.Tag us with the hashtag #citylabontheground and we'll feature it on CityLabâ€s Instagram page or pull them together for the next edition of Navigator.Iâ€m off the week after this one so look out for the next edition of Navigator in approximately 4 weeks.Cheers!Tanvi

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: 4 hidden habits that may affect your blood pressure

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High blood pressure risk isnâ€t just genetics.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Hospital gifting toddler with new prosthetic leg after old one is stolen from mother’s car

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A toddler whose $10,000 prosthetic leg was stolen will soon be walking again thanks to the support of doctors and his community.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Hookah users inhale more toxic chemicals than cigarette smokers, new study claims

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Smoking hookah tobacco negatively impacts heart rate and blood pressure and connections have been made  between smoking the waterpipes regularly and increased risk of coronary artery disease, a new paper said Friday.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Two people contract measles after passenger exposes travelers to virus on international flight to California, officials say

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Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Flu season has peaked, but nasty strain is on rise: report

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CDC officials are warning that flu season is declining, but a stronger strain of the virus is on the rise.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Nonprofits Can’t Help Homeless People When Cities Pay Them Late

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Nonprofits serving the most vulnerable New Yorkers are waiting. The city owes them hundreds of millions of dollars in cost reimbursements, and theyâ€re racking up tens of millions in interest and fees to compensate.In January, 275 nonprofit representatives sounded the alarm in a letter to the mayorâ€s office estimating that almost 20 percent of their agencies are technically insolvent, owing in no small part to chronically late payments on city-funded social services contracts. The city charter mandates that the comptroller “register,â€� i.e. sign off, on a contract, confirming that the city has funds to follow it through. According to data from the city comptroller, in fiscal year 2017 the city registered more than 90 percent of its social services contracts after the contract start date, with an average registration date of 210 days after the start date.New York City agencies usually begin the services per the date on the contract, trusting that it will be registered. Once registered, a contractâ€s scheduled payments can be made but many require the nonprofit to submit a monthly reimbursement form detailing expenses. Each of these must be approved and can incur delays.New York City nonprofits arenâ€t the only ones struggling. Hilda Polanco, founder and CEO of the nonprofit consultancy, Financial Management Association International, has seen gaps of six months or more from the time nonprofits begin delivering services to the time they finally collect the cash that public agencies committed to pay, particularly in Chicago, where social services providers weathered several months of state funding delays. In San Francisco, the Homeless Emergency Service Providers Association (HESPA)â€�a coalition of 30 nonprofits operating on the front lines of the homelessness crisisâ€�sees the same six-month gaps in city-funded contracts, which force their agencies to carry hundreds of thousands or more in month-to-month service costs.As co-chair of HESPA and a senior manager of Larkin Street Youth Services, I have seen and dealt with these problems firsthand. Like many other cities, San Francisco doesnâ€t have the depth and quality of data that the New York City comptroller's office provides, to help quantify the effect on local nonprofits. This visibility into a city's contracting system presents a critical opportunity to amplify the discourse on an issue that poses serious risks not only for nonprofits, but also for the vulnerable communities they serve.These gaps compromise the financial health of individual nonprofits on a scale that weakens the entire social safety net, including the homeless response system. Nonprofits need a steady flow of cash to provide a steady flow of services to cities†most vulnerable residents, particularly homeless residents. When public agencies take months to process payments, nonprofits must divert their resources from the strategic priorities of ending homelessness to the tactical priorities of managing cash. They must furlough staff or delay hiring for critically needed services; they must spend within their means, even if that means providing fewer shelter beds so that more people sleep in the streets.Cities must confront this as a crisisâ€�one that compounds the humanitarian crises, like homelessness, that they contract with nonprofits to solve.Research from Oliver Wyman and SeaChange Capital Partners shows that nationally nearly one in eight social services nonprofits is technically insolvent, “limping along from payroll to payroll.â€� For shelter and housing providers, who generally have high fixed costs, the number jumps to one in three. The reason? Financial stressors imposed by government contracts that not only underpay nonprofits, but underpay them late, with additional compliance and overhead costs red-taped on top.Conceptually, there are two problems in play. The first goes to the amount of money the city is contracted to pay the nonprofit; the second and much more insidious problem is cash flowâ€�the timing of the money out the doors of public agencies and into nonprofit accounts. Even if government contracts paid a sustainable amountâ€�and they donâ€tâ€�a nonprofit with enough contract revenue for the year will have no cash in hand to pay the bills if payment is slow.Nonprofits from New York to San Francisco are delivering unpaid services for up to six months or more while they wait for finalized contracts. And thatâ€s only the first step to getting paid. The second stepâ€�invoicing for paymentâ€�can take an additional 30 to 45 days, depending on the grace period each government agency gives itself for paying nonprofit invoices.New York Cityâ€s homeless services nonprofits may have it the worst. The Department of Homeless Services registered all of its contracts late, most about a year and a half after when services started. To put that in perspective, a nonprofit with a two-year contract may do 75 percent of the work before it sees a dollar in reimbursement. Thatâ€s a long time to wait, especially for nonprofits paying not just their own office rents, but also the rents keeping thousands of formerly homeless people in housing.In New York City, SeaChange calculates a cash flow burden of $675 million for the 1,025 nonprofits with City contracts for social services. This breaks down to $662 million in “negativeâ€� cash flow (i.e., nonprofits delivering services faster than theyâ€re being reimbursed) and an additional $13 million in financing costs, like interest and fees. While the negative cash flow is not an “absolute lossâ€�â€�it will be reimbursed eventuallyâ€�the interest and fees are a non-refundable cost of doing business with the city. And these unnecessary fees end up being diverted to banks and lending institutions rather than providing for the people who need basic necessities like shelter. When money canâ€t get out the door fast enough to provide shelter and housing, homeless people often canâ€t get inside.Emergency housing subsidies are a perfect example: a nonprofit may have a contract that pays for 50 people to sleep inside (at motels, single room occupancy (SRO) hotels, etc.), but if the contract doesnâ€t pay for several months, then the nonprofit must buy shelter with whatever cash it has on hand. In practice, this could mean that only 10 people get shelter while the other 40 sleep outsideâ€�despite the fact that thereâ€s a city contract paying for all 50 people to be inside.Of course, buildings owned or leased by nonprofits will provide the same number of beds regardless of whether the nonprofit gets paid on time. But in high-rent jurisdictions that rely on rental subsidies to shelter homeless people, cash flow is the lifeblood of the system. Landlords on the open market wonâ€t wait for the rent.When seemingly routine administrative delays result in more people being homeless on any given night, cities should treat it like a crisis. But officials may be reluctant: Cities already struggling with a homelessness crisis can hardly afford a secondary bureaucratic crisis of the cityâ€s own making.  In New York City, the solutions are flowing about as slowly as the cash. The de Blasio administration launched a Nonprofit Resiliency Committee when cash-flow problems surfaced in 2016, but officials recently told the City Council that improvements to the contracting system wonâ€t come online until 2020.SeaChange recommends several fixes, from creating a $150 million fund to finance the smaller contracts (theyâ€re 75 percent of all contracts), to collecting fees from late-paying public agencies and using those to capitalize the fund. Above all, SeaChange notes that nonprofit boards must be “laser-focused on liquidity,â€� which may mean rejecting “on-missionâ€� contracts with “potentially fatal timing delays.â€�Cities should also be laser-focused on liquidity. While solutions could surely include financing mechanisms and other creative workarounds, they should primarily target the system itselfâ€�simplifying policies and procedures, eliminating unnecessary layers of administration, and reducing grace periods for paying invoicesâ€�rather than enable an unacceptable status quo that deprives nonprofits of operating cash and makes homeless people wait for the services they need today.Housing is the answer to homelessness; it's just not the only answer. Housing only works when money can get out the door fast enough to sustain it. City contracting systems should be helping people off the streetsâ€�not inadvertently keeping them there.    

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: NJ teens shovel snowy driveway at 4 a.m. for elderly neighbor needing dialysis

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“Snow angels disguised as Parsippany High School seniors.�

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: 9 Women in Science and Tech Who Should Be Household Names

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From code breakers and proto-programmers to molecular biologists and AI leaders, their work has broken barriers and set the stage for the future.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Music captivates listeners and synchronizes their brainwaves

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When listeners engage with music, they follow its sounds closely. But what is it about music that keeps the audience engaged? A recent study charts new ground in understanding the neural responses to music.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Gene identified that increases risk of antibiotic reaction

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Researchers have identified a gene that increases the risk for a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction to the commonly prescribed antibiotic vancomycin.

Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: CityLab Daily: The Stark Traffic Safety Divide

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What Weâ€re FollowingCrossroads: The United States is on track to report its highest number of pedestrian fatalities since 1990, with an estimated 6,227 deaths in the preliminary 2018 data. Researchers say the surge in deaths shows that something has gone terribly wrong in the last 10 years.There are many clues as to why. Americans are spending more time driving, smartphones have introduced new distractions, and more lethal heavy-duty SUVs have proliferated. And old dangers that inhibit driversâ€�like darkness and alcoholâ€�have remained stubbornly pervasive.U.S. Pedestrian Fatalities 1990-2018 (Governors Highway Safety Association)On the other side of the windshield, people inside Americaâ€s cars and trucks have never been better protected. As pedestrian deaths increased by 35 percent from 2008 to 2017, the number of all other traffic deaths dropped by 6 percent. The pedestrian picture isnâ€t entirely bleak: Local Vision Zero plans that are specifically geared at improving pedestrian safety appear to have been effective, as the 10 largest cities reported a 15 percent decline in pedestrian fatalities in 2017. But those efforts have concentrated on city downtowns, while a growing number of fatal crashes are happening in the suburbs and exurbs. CityLabâ€s Sarah Holder has the story: The Stark Traffic Safety Divideâ€�Andrew SmallMore on CityLabMinneapolis†Snow Parking Ban Winks at its Pro-Transit Future Sorry, drivers. Record-breaking February snowfall has forced the Twin Cities to remove more than a third of their street parking.David MontgomeryHow Marvel Packs a Universe Into New York City The Marvel Cinematic Universe is a massive mythos with the Big Apple at its center. Hereâ€s what Spider-Man, Iron Man, and other superheroes say about their city.Nolan GrayJane Jacobs and the Power of Women Planners In a field dominated by men, Jacobs broke through with groundbreaking, decidedly female ideas about how cities should workRoberta Brandes GratzA Major Chicago Public Housing Lawsuit Ends. The Segregation It Confronted Lives On. Over 50 years after the “Gautreauxâ€� case began, the cityâ€s neighborhoods remain divided along racial lines.Sophie Kasakove Sex, Vomit, and Criminalized Pedestrians: Is This the Future of Self-Driving Cars? In Episode 2 of our new podcast Technopolis, we take you on a tour of autonomous vehicles†little-considered effects.Molly Turner and Jim KapsisWhat Weâ€re ReadingThe Midwest will likely raise gas taxesâ€�and widen highways (Streetsblog)Airbnb is buying into the hotel industry (Quartz)Is Chicago done with “tribalâ€� voting? (Chicago magazine)Dollar Tree was once considered “Amazon-proof.â€� Now itâ€s closing hundreds of stores. (Vox)People bought the “panhandle murderâ€� story because they think the worst of Baltimore (Washington Post)Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.